PROGRAM

Please note that the times are given in Central European Summer Time (CET+1).

After each prerecorded scientific presentation, there will be a short discussion where the moderators and presenter will join in livestreaming.

7th EVIW FINAL PROGRAM
Opening Session
Sunday, 29 August 2021
SYSTEMS IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Isabelle Schwartz & Gregers Jungersen
16:00-16:03
Milica Kovačević Filipović

Milica Kovačević Filipović, DVM, obtained her Ph.D. at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade (FVMUB), Serbia. She had 18 months of postdoctoral studies in research on stem cells in France (Institute for Natural Substances Chemistry, CNRS, Paris and National French Institute for Blood, Bordeaux). Since 2016 she has been holding a position of full professor at the Department of Pathophysiology at FVMUB where she is dedicated to the development of clinical pathology service.  The domain of investigation: a comparative view of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, and inflammatory reaction in vector-borne diseases.


Milica Kovačević Filipović

Milica Kovačević Filipović, DVM, obtained her Ph.D. at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade (FVMUB), Serbia. She had 18 months of postdoctoral studies in research on stem cells in France (Institute for Natural Substances Chemistry, CNRS, Paris and National French Institute for Blood, Bordeaux). Since 2016 she has been holding a position of full professor at the Department of Pathophysiology at FVMUB where she is dedicated to the development of clinical pathology service.  The domain of investigation: a comparative view of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, and inflammatory reaction in vector-borne diseases.

Milica Kovačević Filipović, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia: “Opening session - part one”
16:03-16:09
Gregers Jungersen

DVM Gregers Jungersen is the current chair of EVIG with daily duties as Research Professor in Veterinary Vaccine Research at Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark. For more than 25 years I have been investigating immune responses to both virus and bacterial infections in mainly pigs and cattle. I am particularly focused on how desired immune correlates of protection can be obtained with optimal vaccine design and the untapped synergy between veterinary immunology and vaccine research, and human vaccinology.


Gregers Jungersen

DVM Gregers Jungersen is the current chair of EVIG with daily duties as Research Professor in Veterinary Vaccine Research at Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark. For more than 25 years I have been investigating immune responses to both virus and bacterial infections in mainly pigs and cattle. I am particularly focused on how desired immune correlates of protection can be obtained with optimal vaccine design and the untapped synergy between veterinary immunology and vaccine research, and human vaccinology.

Gregers Jungersen, Statens Serum Institute, Denmark: “Opening session - part two”
16:10-16:45
Ronald N. Germain

Ronald N. Germain received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. Since then he has investigated basic immunobiology, first on the faculty of Harvard Medical School, then in the Laboratory of Immunology, NIAID, NIH, and most recently at NIAID, NIH as Chief of the Laboratory of Immune System Biology. He has made key contributions to understanding MHC class II molecule structure–function relationships, the cell biology of antigen processing, the molecular basis of T cell recognition, and the application of systems biology to understanding immune function. More recently, his laboratory has explored the immune system using dynamic and static in situ microscopic methods that his laboratory helped pioneer. He has published more than 400 scholarly research papers and reviews. Among numerous honors, he was elected Associate member of EMBO (2008), elected to the National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences USA (2013), received the Meritorious Career Award from the American Association of Immunologists (2015), chosen as NIAID Outstanding Mentor (2016), elected to the National Academy of Sciences (2016), designated an NIH Distinguished Investigator and named a Distinguished Fellow of the AAI. He has trained more than 70 postdoctoral fellows, many of whom hold senior academic and administrative positions at leading universities and medical schools.


Ronald N. Germain

Ronald N. Germain received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. Since then he has investigated basic immunobiology, first on the faculty of Harvard Medical School, then in the Laboratory of Immunology, NIAID, NIH, and most recently at NIAID, NIH as Chief of the Laboratory of Immune System Biology. He has made key contributions to understanding MHC class II molecule structure–function relationships, the cell biology of antigen processing, the molecular basis of T cell recognition, and the application of systems biology to understanding immune function. More recently, his laboratory has explored the immune system using dynamic and static in situ microscopic methods that his laboratory helped pioneer. He has published more than 400 scholarly research papers and reviews. Among numerous honors, he was elected Associate member of EMBO (2008), elected to the National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences USA (2013), received the Meritorious Career Award from the American Association of Immunologists (2015), chosen as NIAID Outstanding Mentor (2016), elected to the National Academy of Sciences (2016), designated an NIH Distinguished Investigator and named a Distinguished Fellow of the AAI. He has trained more than 70 postdoctoral fellows, many of whom hold senior academic and administrative positions at leading universities and medical schools.

Ronald N. Germain, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, USA: “High Dimensional Interrogation of Tissue Architecture and Cellular State Using New Methods for Optical Imaging”
16:50-17:25
Marc Dalod

Dr Dalod is heading the team “Dendritic cells and antiviral defense” at the Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy (CIML), in Marseille, France. He aims at understanding which combinations of dendritic cell (DC) types and activation states promote protective antiviral or anti-tumor immunity, and how. He is also dissecting how the functions of interferons can be beneficial or deleterious, depending on the pathophysiological context (Tomasello et al. Front Immunol. 2014), including during respiratory infections with Influenza or SARS-CoV strains causing severe lung immunopathology, in collaboration with Drs. Elena Tomasello, Ana Zarubica & Bernard Malissen.

Dr. Dalod trained for Ph.D. under the supervision of Drs. Elisabeth Gomard & Jean-Gérard Guillet, in Paris, from 1996 to 2000, studying CD8+ T cell responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). He discovered that anti-HIV-1 CD8+ T cell responses appear to be delayed and blunted during primary infection, as compared to responses described against acute infections with Epstein-Barr or Measles viruses (Dalod et al. J Clin. Invest. 1999). He hypothesized that HIV-1 infection was compromising the cross-talk between innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, for post-doctoral training, he joined the laboratory of Pr. Christine A. Biron (Brown University, USA) to examine the role of DCs and natural killer cells in antiviral immunity in mice. There, in collaboration with Drs. Giorgio Trinchieri, Carine Asselin-Paturel and colleagues (Schering-Plough, France), he contributed to the discovery and first in vivo functional study of mouse plasmacytoid DCs (Asselin-Paturel et al. Nat. Immunol. 2001; Dalod et al. J Exp Med. 2002; 2003).

Since joining the CIML in 2003, Dr Dalod has contributed to pioneer the use of comparative genomics to align immune cell types across tissues and species (Robbins et al. Genome Biol. 2008; Crozat et al. Immunol. Rev. 2010). He uses this strategy to identify conserved gene modules instructing DC ontogeny and functional polarization, and to increase the likelihood of translation to other vertebrate species of the discoveries made in mice (Vu Manh TP et al. Front Immunol. 2015a; 2015b). This work benefited from fruitful collaborations with Dr. Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil for animal species of agronomical interest and with Dr. Anne Hosmalin for humans and non-human primates.

H index: 49; 10,947 citations; 12 first or last author papers cited >100 times each.


Marc Dalod

Dr Dalod is heading the team “Dendritic cells and antiviral defense” at the Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy (CIML), in Marseille, France. He aims at understanding which combinations of dendritic cell (DC) types and activation states promote protective antiviral or anti-tumor immunity, and how. He is also dissecting how the functions of interferons can be beneficial or deleterious, depending on the pathophysiological context (Tomasello et al. Front Immunol. 2014), including during respiratory infections with Influenza or SARS-CoV strains causing severe lung immunopathology, in collaboration with Drs. Elena Tomasello, Ana Zarubica & Bernard Malissen.

Dr. Dalod trained for Ph.D. under the supervision of Drs. Elisabeth Gomard & Jean-Gérard Guillet, in Paris, from 1996 to 2000, studying CD8+ T cell responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). He discovered that anti-HIV-1 CD8+ T cell responses appear to be delayed and blunted during primary infection, as compared to responses described against acute infections with Epstein-Barr or Measles viruses (Dalod et al. J Clin. Invest. 1999). He hypothesized that HIV-1 infection was compromising the cross-talk between innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, for post-doctoral training, he joined the laboratory of Pr. Christine A. Biron (Brown University, USA) to examine the role of DCs and natural killer cells in antiviral immunity in mice. There, in collaboration with Drs. Giorgio Trinchieri, Carine Asselin-Paturel and colleagues (Schering-Plough, France), he contributed to the discovery and first in vivo functional study of mouse plasmacytoid DCs (Asselin-Paturel et al. Nat. Immunol. 2001; Dalod et al. J Exp Med. 2002; 2003).

Since joining the CIML in 2003, Dr Dalod has contributed to pioneer the use of comparative genomics to align immune cell types across tissues and species (Robbins et al. Genome Biol. 2008; Crozat et al. Immunol. Rev. 2010). He uses this strategy to identify conserved gene modules instructing DC ontogeny and functional polarization, and to increase the likelihood of translation to other vertebrate species of the discoveries made in mice (Vu Manh TP et al. Front Immunol. 2015a; 2015b). This work benefited from fruitful collaborations with Dr. Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil for animal species of agronomical interest and with Dr. Anne Hosmalin for humans and non-human primates.

H index: 49; 10,947 citations; 12 first or last author papers cited >100 times each.

Marc Dalod, Marseille-Luminy Immunology Center, France: “Deciphering the cell type and spatiotemporal pattern of type I and III interferons responses during viral infections, to understand how they tilt the balance towards health or disease”
17:30-18:00 Coffee break with fortune telling
Plenary Session
Sunday, 29 August 2021
BIG VETERINARY VACCINOLOGY CHALLENGES
Moderators: Isabelle Schwartz & Artur Summerfield
18:00-18:27
Nicole Baumgarth

Dr. Nicole Baumgarth received her DVM and PhD from the School of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover, Germany. Following post-doctoral training in Australia, at the Walter and Elisa Hall Institute in Melbourne and the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Brisbane, she joined the Herzenberg laboratory at the Stanford University Medical School as staff researcher. Since 2000 she has been on the faculty of the University of California Davis, at the Dept. Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology in the School of Veterinary Medicine. Her research laboratory is situated at the Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases (formerly the Center for Comparative Medicine) at UC Davis where she is leading a NIH-supported research program focused on host-pathogen interactions, using mouse models of influenza virus infection and infections with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Her laboratory is exploring the mechanisms that regulate humoral immunity and the regulation and functions of B cell subsets in infection. Dr. Baumgarth was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2019.

 

 


Nicole Baumgarth

Dr. Nicole Baumgarth received her DVM and PhD from the School of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover, Germany. Following post-doctoral training in Australia, at the Walter and Elisa Hall Institute in Melbourne and the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Brisbane, she joined the Herzenberg laboratory at the Stanford University Medical School as staff researcher. Since 2000 she has been on the faculty of the University of California Davis, at the Dept. Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology in the School of Veterinary Medicine. Her research laboratory is situated at the Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases (formerly the Center for Comparative Medicine) at UC Davis where she is leading a NIH-supported research program focused on host-pathogen interactions, using mouse models of influenza virus infection and infections with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Her laboratory is exploring the mechanisms that regulate humoral immunity and the regulation and functions of B cell subsets in infection. Dr. Baumgarth was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2019.

 

 

Nicole Baumgarth, College of Biological Sciences, UC Davis, USA: “Basic concepts in the regulation of B cell responses”
18:30-18:40
Marie Bonnet-Di Placido

After a Master degree in Agronomy with a training on Camel antibodies at the Pasteur Institute of Paris in 2002, Marie did a PhD in molecular Immunology at the CIML in Marseille (France), to build dynamical models of V(D)J recombination and allelic exclusion. She then did a multidisciplinary Post-doctorate at the IGC in Lisbon-Oeiras (Portugal) on illegitimate DNA rearrangements in T-lymphocytes to determine the Recombination Activating Genes off-targets DNA sequence and epigenetic features. Marie then moved to Africa where she became the Courses & Meetings Coordinator and Principal Education Counsellor at the French Lycée of Pointe-Noire (Congo). She joined the Immunogenetics Group at the Pirbright Institute (UK) as Scientific Project Manager in February 2019 to work on FMDV specific antibody discovery, as part as a Bill and Melinda Gates Fundation project. She is now Senior post-doctoral scientist and project coordinator of the Antibody Hub and the FMDV projects.


Marie Bonnet-Di Placido

After a Master degree in Agronomy with a training on Camel antibodies at the Pasteur Institute of Paris in 2002, Marie did a PhD in molecular Immunology at the CIML in Marseille (France), to build dynamical models of V(D)J recombination and allelic exclusion. She then did a multidisciplinary Post-doctorate at the IGC in Lisbon-Oeiras (Portugal) on illegitimate DNA rearrangements in T-lymphocytes to determine the Recombination Activating Genes off-targets DNA sequence and epigenetic features. Marie then moved to Africa where she became the Courses & Meetings Coordinator and Principal Education Counsellor at the French Lycée of Pointe-Noire (Congo). She joined the Immunogenetics Group at the Pirbright Institute (UK) as Scientific Project Manager in February 2019 to work on FMDV specific antibody discovery, as part as a Bill and Melinda Gates Fundation project. She is now Senior post-doctoral scientist and project coordinator of the Antibody Hub and the FMDV projects.

Marie Bonnet-Di Placido, The Pirbright Institute, United Kingdom: “Serial vaccination of cattle with four foot-and-mouth disease virus antigens enables cross-specific antibody discovery”
18:43-18:53
Heather Mathie

Heather Mathie gained her MSci Immunology from the University of Glasgow in 2013.  During her this time she undertook a work placement with Mika Ramet at the University of Tampere which led to a life-long interest in mycobacterial infection.  Heather went on to achieve a PhD in Bovine Immunology from the University of Edinburgh in 2018, focusing on the macrophage response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.  Since then, she has continued her research as a post-doc with Jayne Hope at the Roslin Institute. 

Her current research uses bovine afferent lymphatic cannulation to access dendritic cells (DC) draining from vaccination sites in order to measure the response of DC to vaccine antigen ex-vivo. She utilises next generation sequencing, including single-cell RNA-Seq to analyse and compare the response of DCs to phylogenetically diverse vaccines with the aim of identifying correlates of protection that could be used to screen vaccine candidates in vitro


Heather Mathie

Heather Mathie gained her MSci Immunology from the University of Glasgow in 2013.  During her this time she undertook a work placement with Mika Ramet at the University of Tampere which led to a life-long interest in mycobacterial infection.  Heather went on to achieve a PhD in Bovine Immunology from the University of Edinburgh in 2018, focusing on the macrophage response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.  Since then, she has continued her research as a post-doc with Jayne Hope at the Roslin Institute. 

Her current research uses bovine afferent lymphatic cannulation to access dendritic cells (DC) draining from vaccination sites in order to measure the response of DC to vaccine antigen ex-vivo. She utilises next generation sequencing, including single-cell RNA-Seq to analyse and compare the response of DCs to phylogenetically diverse vaccines with the aim of identifying correlates of protection that could be used to screen vaccine candidates in vitro

Heather Mathie, Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom: “Characterising the Dendritic Cell Response to BCG Using a Bovine Afferent Lymphatic Cannulation Model and Single-Cell RNA-Seq”
18:56-19:06
Artur Summerfield

Artur Summerfield is a veterinary immunologist with particular interest on the immune response to infectious disease and vaccines in pigs and ruminants. His research focused on antigen presenting cells, as well as understanding and developing novel immunotherapeutics and vaccines. He studied veterinary medicine in Berlin and obtained his PhD 1994 in Tübingen at the Federal Research Center for Viral Diseases (now Friedrich-Löffler-Institute) Germany. He then moved to the Institute of Virology and Immunology in Mittelhäusern, Switzerland first as postdoctoral scientist. In 2006, he became head of the Laboratory of Immunology and in 2010 of the Research Department at this Institute. In 2013, he was nominated Professor of Veterinary Immunology at the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Bern.


Artur Summerfield

Artur Summerfield is a veterinary immunologist with particular interest on the immune response to infectious disease and vaccines in pigs and ruminants. His research focused on antigen presenting cells, as well as understanding and developing novel immunotherapeutics and vaccines. He studied veterinary medicine in Berlin and obtained his PhD 1994 in Tübingen at the Federal Research Center for Viral Diseases (now Friedrich-Löffler-Institute) Germany. He then moved to the Institute of Virology and Immunology in Mittelhäusern, Switzerland first as postdoctoral scientist. In 2006, he became head of the Laboratory of Immunology and in 2010 of the Research Department at this Institute. In 2013, he was nominated Professor of Veterinary Immunology at the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Bern.

Artur Summerfield, Institute of Virology and Immunology, Mittelhausern, Switzerland: “Systems immunology analyses of porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus infection and vaccination ”
19:09-19:16
Alexandra Correia

Alexandra Correia (AC) graduated in Animal Science Engineering (UTAD, 1998) and holds an MSc in Agrarian Sciences – Animal Production (UTAD, 2003). She defended her PhD thesis in Sciences, speciality Biology, at University of Minho in December 2012, addressing Candida albicans virulence factors as vaccination targets against systemic candidiasis. She worked as Postdoctoral Research Scientist at IBMC from 2013-2018 in the immune response to the parasite Neospora caninum. Since 2019, she is an Assistant Researcher at i3S and is the PI of projects in mucosal vaccination against bovine neosporosis. AC authored/co-authored 50 scientific articles in international peer-review journals and 2 book chapters. She supervised/co-supervised several MsC or undergraduate students, and supervises/cosupervises 4 PhD students in Veterinary Immunology or Immunology to Infection. AC teaches immunology to the Integrated Masters in Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Bioengeneering, and Dental Medicine.
Her main research interests concern mucosal vaccination, veterinary immunology with a focus on Neospora caninum infections and in the interaction between immunity and nutrition.


Alexandra Correia

Alexandra Correia (AC) graduated in Animal Science Engineering (UTAD, 1998) and holds an MSc in Agrarian Sciences – Animal Production (UTAD, 2003). She defended her PhD thesis in Sciences, speciality Biology, at University of Minho in December 2012, addressing Candida albicans virulence factors as vaccination targets against systemic candidiasis. She worked as Postdoctoral Research Scientist at IBMC from 2013-2018 in the immune response to the parasite Neospora caninum. Since 2019, she is an Assistant Researcher at i3S and is the PI of projects in mucosal vaccination against bovine neosporosis. AC authored/co-authored 50 scientific articles in international peer-review journals and 2 book chapters. She supervised/co-supervised several MsC or undergraduate students, and supervises/cosupervises 4 PhD students in Veterinary Immunology or Immunology to Infection. AC teaches immunology to the Integrated Masters in Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Bioengeneering, and Dental Medicine.
Her main research interests concern mucosal vaccination, veterinary immunology with a focus on Neospora caninum infections and in the interaction between immunity and nutrition.

Alexandra Correia, University of Porto, Portugal: “Optimization of a combined mucosal and systemic immunization strategy against neosporosis in cattle”
19:19-19:26
Sara Tomaiuolo

Sara Tomaiuolo is a second year PhD candidate in Veterinary Medicine at Ghent University and Sciensano (Belgium). During the first year, she focused on the genetic characterization of animal and human Coxiella burnetii Belgian strains to assess strain diversity and host-pathogen interaction as well as the public health risk in Belgium. Currently, she is working to characterize the host immune responses against C. burnetii infection in goats and to evaluate the potential effect of pre-existing vaccines as well as novel vaccine formulations against C. burnetii.


Sara Tomaiuolo

Sara Tomaiuolo is a second year PhD candidate in Veterinary Medicine at Ghent University and Sciensano (Belgium). During the first year, she focused on the genetic characterization of animal and human Coxiella burnetii Belgian strains to assess strain diversity and host-pathogen interaction as well as the public health risk in Belgium. Currently, she is working to characterize the host immune responses against C. burnetii infection in goats and to evaluate the potential effect of pre-existing vaccines as well as novel vaccine formulations against C. burnetii.

Sara Tomaiuolo, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent; Sciensano, Belgium: “QuilA-adjuvanted Coxevac® triggers a CD8+/IFNγ-driven cell-mediated immune response and enhanced total IgG production in Coxiella burnetii-challenged goats ”
19:31-19:36
Welcome movie

Welcome movie
Welcome movie, National Tourism Organisation of Serbia: “The Danube in Serbia - 588 Impressions”
Plenary Sessions
Monday, 30 August 2021
ADAPTIVE IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Wilhelm Gerner & Friederike Ebner
09:55-09:59
Monday good morning movie

Monday good morning movie
Monday good morning movie, National Tourism Organisation of Serbia: “Soulfood Serbia”
10:00-10:25
Ahmed Hegazy

Prof. Dr. Ahmed N. Hegazy studied medicine both at the Cairo University and Hannover Medical School. He received his medical degree and did his M.D. thesis in the laboratory of Prof. Christoph Klein at Hannover Medical School. Subsequently he obtained his Ph.D. in Immunology and Infection Biology from Humboldt University of Berlin after working with Prof. Andreas Radbruch and Prof. Max Loehning at the German Rheumatism Research Center-Berlin (DRFZ). During his Ph.D., he spent 2 years at the laboratory of Prof. Hans Hengartner and Rolf Zinkernagel at the University of Zurich and ETH-Zurich, Switzerland. Ahmed performed his postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Prof. Fiona Powrie at the Translational Gastroenterology and Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford. Ahmed is a clinician scientist and currently a Lichtenberg-Professor for Translational Gastroenterology at the Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin.

Research Interests & ongoing projects

1. T cell heterogenity and diversity in intestinal inflammation; 2. Microbiota-reactive T cell responses in inflammatory bowel disease; 3. Epithelial - Immune cell interaction; 4. IBD therapy response biomarkers.


Ahmed Hegazy

Prof. Dr. Ahmed N. Hegazy studied medicine both at the Cairo University and Hannover Medical School. He received his medical degree and did his M.D. thesis in the laboratory of Prof. Christoph Klein at Hannover Medical School. Subsequently he obtained his Ph.D. in Immunology and Infection Biology from Humboldt University of Berlin after working with Prof. Andreas Radbruch and Prof. Max Loehning at the German Rheumatism Research Center-Berlin (DRFZ). During his Ph.D., he spent 2 years at the laboratory of Prof. Hans Hengartner and Rolf Zinkernagel at the University of Zurich and ETH-Zurich, Switzerland. Ahmed performed his postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Prof. Fiona Powrie at the Translational Gastroenterology and Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford. Ahmed is a clinician scientist and currently a Lichtenberg-Professor for Translational Gastroenterology at the Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin.

Research Interests & ongoing projects

1. T cell heterogenity and diversity in intestinal inflammation; 2. Microbiota-reactive T cell responses in inflammatory bowel disease; 3. Epithelial - Immune cell interaction; 4. IBD therapy response biomarkers.

Ahmed Hegazy, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany: “Host microbe interactions in the intestine - cytokines and T cell responses”
10:30-10:40
Sonia Villanueva-Hernandez

My name is Sonia Villanueva and I am a last year PhD student at the Institute of Immunology from the Veterinary Medicine University of Vienna. My thesis has mainly focused on studying plasma cells and T follicular helper cells in the pig. 

My contact e-mail is: Sonia.VillanuevaHernandez@vetmeduni.ac.at


Sonia Villanueva-Hernandez

My name is Sonia Villanueva and I am a last year PhD student at the Institute of Immunology from the Veterinary Medicine University of Vienna. My thesis has mainly focused on studying plasma cells and T follicular helper cells in the pig. 

My contact e-mail is: Sonia.VillanuevaHernandez@vetmeduni.ac.at

Sonia Villanueva-Hernandez, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria: “Identification of porcine CD4+ lymphocytes with T follicular helper cell properties”
10:43-10:53
Melissa Stas

Melissa Stas is a PhD candidate working under the supervision of Prof. Andrea Ladinig (University Clinic for Swine, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna) and Prof. Wilhelm Gerner (Pirbright Institute, former: Institute of Immunology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna). She is very passionate about her work, which focusses on elucidating the phenotype and function of immune cells at the porcine maternal-fetal interface and how this niche is affected by viral infection (e.g. Porcine Respiratory Syndrome virus).

Prior to joining the group of Prof. Andrea Ladinig, she studied and obtained her master’s degree of Biomedical Sciences at KULeuven. She always had a keen interest in immunology and for her Master thesis; she investigated Matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated proteolysis of the interleukin-2 system receptors.

Contact details: Melissa.stas@vetmeduni.ac.at


Melissa Stas

Melissa Stas is a PhD candidate working under the supervision of Prof. Andrea Ladinig (University Clinic for Swine, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna) and Prof. Wilhelm Gerner (Pirbright Institute, former: Institute of Immunology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna). She is very passionate about her work, which focusses on elucidating the phenotype and function of immune cells at the porcine maternal-fetal interface and how this niche is affected by viral infection (e.g. Porcine Respiratory Syndrome virus).

Prior to joining the group of Prof. Andrea Ladinig, she studied and obtained her master’s degree of Biomedical Sciences at KULeuven. She always had a keen interest in immunology and for her Master thesis; she investigated Matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated proteolysis of the interleukin-2 system receptors.

Contact details: Melissa.stas@vetmeduni.ac.at

Melissa Stas, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria: “T cell phenotypes at the maternal-fetal interface in sows during late gestation”
10:56-11:06
Sandra Vreman

Sandra Vreman studied Veterinary Medicine at the Utrecht University (2000). After several years as small animal practitioner, she followed a residency for veterinary pathology at the Utrecht University and became a diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Pathologists (ECVP-2015). Her PhD obtained at the Wageningen University (2020) was focused on porcine neonatal immune responses and vaccine adjuvants. Currently she works as researcher and veterinary pathologist at Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR) in Lelystad with special interest for infectious diseases, immunopathology, neonatal immune responses, vaccine adjuvants and animal models.


Sandra Vreman

Sandra Vreman studied Veterinary Medicine at the Utrecht University (2000). After several years as small animal practitioner, she followed a residency for veterinary pathology at the Utrecht University and became a diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Pathologists (ECVP-2015). Her PhD obtained at the Wageningen University (2020) was focused on porcine neonatal immune responses and vaccine adjuvants. Currently she works as researcher and veterinary pathologist at Wageningen Bioveterinary Research (WBVR) in Lelystad with special interest for infectious diseases, immunopathology, neonatal immune responses, vaccine adjuvants and animal models.

Sandra Vreman, Wageningen Bioveterinary Research, the Netherlands: “Assessing colostrum and sow antibody levels to determine Streptococcus suis specific maternal derived antibodies in piglets ”
11:09-11:19Heike Köhler, Institute of Molecular Pathogenesis, Jena, Germany : “Immunogenicity of recombinant BCG vaccine candidates in goats”
11:22-11:32
Roger-Junior Eloiflin

Roger Junior Eloiflin will defend his PhD thesis on the virulence of Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) virus in relation to host immunity in December 2021. The main objective of his research is to find the immune or viral factors that influence the virulence of PPR virus. His work is the result of a partnership between ASTRE unit based in Montpellier - France (CIRAD research unit working on the Animal/Human/Environment interface) and the Institute of Virology and Immunology in Bern - Switzerland.


Roger-Junior Eloiflin

Roger Junior Eloiflin will defend his PhD thesis on the virulence of Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) virus in relation to host immunity in December 2021. The main objective of his research is to find the immune or viral factors that influence the virulence of PPR virus. His work is the result of a partnership between ASTRE unit based in Montpellier - France (CIRAD research unit working on the Animal/Human/Environment interface) and the Institute of Virology and Immunology in Bern - Switzerland.

Roger-Junior Eloiflin, International Cooperation Centre for Agricultural Research for Development, Switzerland: “Identification of differential responses of goat PBMCs to PPRV virulence using a multi-omics approach”
11:35-12:00 Coffee break with fortune telling
ONE HEALTH APPROACH TO PANDEMIC PREPAREDNESS
Moderators: Dirk Werling & Bill Golde
12:00-12:02 A message from our sponsor - Beckman Coulter
12:03-12:23
Richard Kock

Richard Kock is a wildlife veterinary ecologist in the field of wildlife health focused on Africa and Asia. He works in One Health at the interface between animals, humans and environment and on the role of food systems in disease emergence and environmental change. 40 years as a professional, 28 years attached to the Zoological Society of London mostly resident in Nairobi, Kenya, seconded to Wildlife Service and African Union. 10 years as Prof Wildlife Health and Emerging Diseases at the Royal Veterinary College London. Awarded FAO Bronze Medal in 2010 in recognition of work on morbilliviruses and eradication of rinderpest virus and the Tom and Beth Williams Award - Wildlife Disease Association for exceptional contributions to understanding wildlife disease of policy relevance. His research portfolio involves over £1.5 million. More than 224 peer reviewed publications, book chapters. RG score 40.12 h index 44 i10 index 124 citations 9020. He established at RVC One Health MSc jointly with London School Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and he lectures on One Health and Wildlife disease. Associate Research Fellow Chatham House Co-chair IUCN Species Survival Commission Wildlife Health Specialist Group Strategic Futures Committee Wildlife Disease Association Adjunct Prof Tufts University Grafton USA; Njala University Bo Sierra Leone.


Richard Kock

Richard Kock is a wildlife veterinary ecologist in the field of wildlife health focused on Africa and Asia. He works in One Health at the interface between animals, humans and environment and on the role of food systems in disease emergence and environmental change. 40 years as a professional, 28 years attached to the Zoological Society of London mostly resident in Nairobi, Kenya, seconded to Wildlife Service and African Union. 10 years as Prof Wildlife Health and Emerging Diseases at the Royal Veterinary College London. Awarded FAO Bronze Medal in 2010 in recognition of work on morbilliviruses and eradication of rinderpest virus and the Tom and Beth Williams Award - Wildlife Disease Association for exceptional contributions to understanding wildlife disease of policy relevance. His research portfolio involves over £1.5 million. More than 224 peer reviewed publications, book chapters. RG score 40.12 h index 44 i10 index 124 citations 9020. He established at RVC One Health MSc jointly with London School Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and he lectures on One Health and Wildlife disease. Associate Research Fellow Chatham House Co-chair IUCN Species Survival Commission Wildlife Health Specialist Group Strategic Futures Committee Wildlife Disease Association Adjunct Prof Tufts University Grafton USA; Njala University Bo Sierra Leone.

Richard Kock, Royal Veterinary College, Department of Pathobiology and Population Sciences, University of London, UK: “Does the immune system tune-in with the environment? – divergent epidemiological experiences with morbillivirus infection in wildlife species.”
12:31-12:51
Harry Dawson

Dr. Harry Dawson earned his Ph.D. in Nutrition from Pennsylvania State University in 1998. He completed his post-doctoral work in the Laboratory of Clinical Immunology at the Gerontology Research Center of the National Institute on Aging in 2001. Since then, he has worked as a senior scientist in the Diet Genomics and Immunology Laboratory at the USDA Agricultural Research Service’s Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center. Dr. Dawson conducts studies on the interactions between dietary factors (primarily vitamin A and D but also garlic, green tea, cinnamon, prebiotics and probiotics), and immune function or inflammation. His research also focuses on swine as surrogates for humans. He has also conducted several large-scale comparative genomic analyses of the porcine immunome, inflammasome and nutriome. He also maintains the Porcine Translational Research database, a bioinformantics database devoted to cross-species (mouse-pig-human) model comparisons. He is the author or co-author of 81 publications. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

 


Harry Dawson

Dr. Harry Dawson earned his Ph.D. in Nutrition from Pennsylvania State University in 1998. He completed his post-doctoral work in the Laboratory of Clinical Immunology at the Gerontology Research Center of the National Institute on Aging in 2001. Since then, he has worked as a senior scientist in the Diet Genomics and Immunology Laboratory at the USDA Agricultural Research Service’s Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center. Dr. Dawson conducts studies on the interactions between dietary factors (primarily vitamin A and D but also garlic, green tea, cinnamon, prebiotics and probiotics), and immune function or inflammation. His research also focuses on swine as surrogates for humans. He has also conducted several large-scale comparative genomic analyses of the porcine immunome, inflammasome and nutriome. He also maintains the Porcine Translational Research database, a bioinformantics database devoted to cross-species (mouse-pig-human) model comparisons. He is the author or co-author of 81 publications. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

 

Harry Dawson, Diet Genomics and Immunology Laboratory, USDA, USA : “A One Health approach toward understanding the human immune response to infectious disease using pigs as models; advantages and limitations.”
12:59-13:06
Simon Graham

Simon studied immunology at the University of Edinburgh and went on to obtain a PhD from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, where he developed a cattle model for testing onchocerciasis vaccines. After post-doctoral positions working on Theilerioses vaccine development at the Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Edinburgh, and the International Livestock Research Institute, Kenya, Simon joined the Animal and Plant Health Agency, leading immunological and vaccine-related research on a number of viral diseases of livestock. Since 2014, Simon has been a Group Leader at The Pirbright Institute and held positions in the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey. The overarching objective of Simon’s research group is to improve our understanding of the interactions between porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses (PRRSV) and the immune system and to exploit this to develop next-generation vaccines. Simon also leads a consortium developing a Nipah virus vaccine for pigs and work utilising the pig as a model for evaluating COVID-19 vaccine candidates. 


Simon Graham

Simon studied immunology at the University of Edinburgh and went on to obtain a PhD from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, where he developed a cattle model for testing onchocerciasis vaccines. After post-doctoral positions working on Theilerioses vaccine development at the Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Edinburgh, and the International Livestock Research Institute, Kenya, Simon joined the Animal and Plant Health Agency, leading immunological and vaccine-related research on a number of viral diseases of livestock. Since 2014, Simon has been a Group Leader at The Pirbright Institute and held positions in the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey. The overarching objective of Simon’s research group is to improve our understanding of the interactions between porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses (PRRSV) and the immune system and to exploit this to develop next-generation vaccines. Simon also leads a consortium developing a Nipah virus vaccine for pigs and work utilising the pig as a model for evaluating COVID-19 vaccine candidates. 

Simon Graham, The Pirbright Institute, United Kingdom: “Developing a ‘One Health’ Nipah virus vaccine to protect animal and public health”
13:10-13:17Jane Edwards, The Pirbright Institute, United Kingdom: “The pig as a pre-clinical model to support COVID-19 vaccine development”
13:21-13:28
Kristel Ramirez

Kristel obtained a licentiate degree in Biological Chemistry at the University San Carlos de Guatemala in 2009, and then did a PhD in Medical Sciences at Kumamoto University (Japan), where she characterized and isolated monoclonal antibodies against HIV-1 in 2015. She then moved to Turkey, where she worked as an Assistant Professor of Medical Microbiology at Altinbas University for two years. She joined the Immunogenetics Group as Postdoctoral Scientist in March 2019 working on the antibody response to FMDV as part of a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation project.


Kristel Ramirez

Kristel obtained a licentiate degree in Biological Chemistry at the University San Carlos de Guatemala in 2009, and then did a PhD in Medical Sciences at Kumamoto University (Japan), where she characterized and isolated monoclonal antibodies against HIV-1 in 2015. She then moved to Turkey, where she worked as an Assistant Professor of Medical Microbiology at Altinbas University for two years. She joined the Immunogenetics Group as Postdoctoral Scientist in March 2019 working on the antibody response to FMDV as part of a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation project.

Kristel Ramirez, The Pirbright Institute, United Kingdom: “Isolation and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor-binding domain derived from pigs vaccinated with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19”
13:30-15:00 Lunch break and poster session
Parallel Sessions A
Monday, 30 August 2021
MUCOSAL IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Eric Cox & Gregers Jungersen
15:00-15:20
Bert Devriendt

Prof. Dr. Bert Devriendt leads the research unit Mucosal Immunology at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University. In 2010 he obtained his PhD in Veterinary Sciences at Ghent University on the interaction between virulence factors of enterotoxigenic E. coli and gut epithelial cells as well as dendritic cells in a piglet model. During his postdoctoral research he focused on host-pathogen interactions in the pig gut and how the gained insights might be used to accelerate the development of oral vaccines to prevent enteric diseases. Building further on this, we are developing and evaluating a novel strategy to promote transport of biologicals and microparticles through the gut epithelium via antibody-mediated selective targeting to epithelial aminopeptidase N.


Bert Devriendt

Prof. Dr. Bert Devriendt leads the research unit Mucosal Immunology at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University. In 2010 he obtained his PhD in Veterinary Sciences at Ghent University on the interaction between virulence factors of enterotoxigenic E. coli and gut epithelial cells as well as dendritic cells in a piglet model. During his postdoctoral research he focused on host-pathogen interactions in the pig gut and how the gained insights might be used to accelerate the development of oral vaccines to prevent enteric diseases. Building further on this, we are developing and evaluating a novel strategy to promote transport of biologicals and microparticles through the gut epithelium via antibody-mediated selective targeting to epithelial aminopeptidase N.

Bert Devriendt, University of Ghent, Belgium: “Exploiting host-pathogen interactions to elicit gut immunity”
15:27-15:47
Elma Tchilian

Elma obtained her PhD at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London, before working as a postdoctoral fellow in Birmingham, Senior Research Scientist at the Edward Jenner Institute and Principal Investigator in Oxford. Elma identified the leucocyte common antigen (CD45) as a cause of severe combined immunodeficiency in man. She demonstrated the importance of local immunity in vaccine-induced protection against tuberculosis and influenza. 

Elma joined the Pirbright Institute in 2014 and is now Head of Mucosal Immunology. She has established a powerful pig influenza model to study immune responses to and transmission of influenza viruses and to test efficacy of vaccines and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Elma’s group identified porcine tissue resident memory cells and generated the first pig influenza mAbs, showing that they recognise the same epitopes as humans. These data demonstrated the utility of the pig as a biomedical model for human disease.


Elma Tchilian

Elma obtained her PhD at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London, before working as a postdoctoral fellow in Birmingham, Senior Research Scientist at the Edward Jenner Institute and Principal Investigator in Oxford. Elma identified the leucocyte common antigen (CD45) as a cause of severe combined immunodeficiency in man. She demonstrated the importance of local immunity in vaccine-induced protection against tuberculosis and influenza. 

Elma joined the Pirbright Institute in 2014 and is now Head of Mucosal Immunology. She has established a powerful pig influenza model to study immune responses to and transmission of influenza viruses and to test efficacy of vaccines and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Elma’s group identified porcine tissue resident memory cells and generated the first pig influenza mAbs, showing that they recognise the same epitopes as humans. These data demonstrated the utility of the pig as a biomedical model for human disease.

Elma Tchilian, The Pirbright Institute, United Kingdom: “Respiratory immunization and mucosal immunity against influenza in pigs”
15:54-16:02
Safieh Zeinali Lathori

My name is Safieh Zeinali Lathori. I am a final-year PhD student in Infection and Immunity at the University of Edinburgh, UK. My PhD thesis is mainly focused on avian intestinal M cells and their development using CSF1R-transgenic birds. Hopefully, this PhD will contribute to better understanding of M cells which could be directly translated into mucosal vaccine delivery purposes. I also graduated with a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine degree from Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran, in 2014. My DVM thesis was about the effect of a probiotic on immune responses against Influenza and Newcastle diseases vaccine in broiler chickens.


Safieh Zeinali Lathori

My name is Safieh Zeinali Lathori. I am a final-year PhD student in Infection and Immunity at the University of Edinburgh, UK. My PhD thesis is mainly focused on avian intestinal M cells and their development using CSF1R-transgenic birds. Hopefully, this PhD will contribute to better understanding of M cells which could be directly translated into mucosal vaccine delivery purposes. I also graduated with a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine degree from Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran, in 2014. My DVM thesis was about the effect of a probiotic on immune responses against Influenza and Newcastle diseases vaccine in broiler chickens.

Safieh Zeinali Lathori, Department of Infection and Immunity, The Roslin Institute, The University of Edinburgh, UK: “Identifying subsets of chicken M cells using the CSF1R-reporter transgenic chickens”
16:06-16:14
Stina Hellman

Stina Hellman is a PhD student at the Dept of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala. She has previously studied agronomy at SLU and holds a Master's degree in infection biology at Uppsala University. Stina will soon (October 2021) defend her thesis focusing on the equine gastro-intestinal helminth Strongylus vulgaris and interactions with its host, as well as the immunomodulatory properties of a novel saponin adjuvant called G3. All studies has been performed in vitro/ex vivo using equine PBMC and intestinal organoid cultures. Stina will at this meeting present her experiences from the set up and use of equine intestinal organoids to study host-pathogen interactions. This is Stinas second time attending EVIW, the first was in Utrecht and hopefully there is more to come!


Stina Hellman

Stina Hellman is a PhD student at the Dept of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala. She has previously studied agronomy at SLU and holds a Master's degree in infection biology at Uppsala University. Stina will soon (October 2021) defend her thesis focusing on the equine gastro-intestinal helminth Strongylus vulgaris and interactions with its host, as well as the immunomodulatory properties of a novel saponin adjuvant called G3. All studies has been performed in vitro/ex vivo using equine PBMC and intestinal organoid cultures. Stina will at this meeting present her experiences from the set up and use of equine intestinal organoids to study host-pathogen interactions. This is Stinas second time attending EVIW, the first was in Utrecht and hopefully there is more to come!

Stina Hellman, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU: “Generation of equine enteroids and enteroid-derived 2D monolayers that are responsive to microbial mimics ”
16:18-16:26
Lindert Benedictus

Lindert Benedictus is an assistant professor in farm animal immunology and infection biology at the division of Farm Animal Health of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Utrecht University. His research focuses on bovine immunology and infection biology and he also teaches in the Veterinary bachelor's and master's curriculum.
Lindert studied Veterinary Medicine at Utrecht University and received his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine, with a specialization in Farm Animal Health, in 2012. Immediately thereafter, Lindert started his PhD studies into "Bovine materno-fetal alloimmune mediated disorders" under supervision of Dr. A.P. Koets, Prof. Dr. V.P.M.G. Rutten and Prof. Dr. M. Nielen at the division of Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, and defended his thesis in 2015. For his first post-doctoral position Lindert worked at the department of Medical Microbiology (University Medical Centre, Utrecht) as well as continuing to work at the division of Immunology. He participated in a project to develop innovative new vaccination strategies against Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy cattle, investigating host-pathogen interactions as well as performing experimental vaccine trials. Next, he moved to Scotland working as a research fellow at the Roslin Institute (University of Edinburgh), studying the role of non-conventional T-cells and antigens as novel vaccine targets for bovine tuberculosis, a collaborative project between the Roslin institute and APHA working with Dr. T. Connelley, Prof. Dr. M. Vordermeier and Prof. Dr. I. Morrison. A major result of this PostDoc was the first functional characterization of MAIT cells in cattle.


Lindert Benedictus

Lindert Benedictus is an assistant professor in farm animal immunology and infection biology at the division of Farm Animal Health of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Utrecht University. His research focuses on bovine immunology and infection biology and he also teaches in the Veterinary bachelor's and master's curriculum.
Lindert studied Veterinary Medicine at Utrecht University and received his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine, with a specialization in Farm Animal Health, in 2012. Immediately thereafter, Lindert started his PhD studies into "Bovine materno-fetal alloimmune mediated disorders" under supervision of Dr. A.P. Koets, Prof. Dr. V.P.M.G. Rutten and Prof. Dr. M. Nielen at the division of Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, and defended his thesis in 2015. For his first post-doctoral position Lindert worked at the department of Medical Microbiology (University Medical Centre, Utrecht) as well as continuing to work at the division of Immunology. He participated in a project to develop innovative new vaccination strategies against Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy cattle, investigating host-pathogen interactions as well as performing experimental vaccine trials. Next, he moved to Scotland working as a research fellow at the Roslin Institute (University of Edinburgh), studying the role of non-conventional T-cells and antigens as novel vaccine targets for bovine tuberculosis, a collaborative project between the Roslin institute and APHA working with Dr. T. Connelley, Prof. Dr. M. Vordermeier and Prof. Dr. I. Morrison. A major result of this PostDoc was the first functional characterization of MAIT cells in cattle.

Lindert Benedictus, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, the Netherlands: “MAIT cells in cattle: Functional characterisation and responses during bacterial infections”
16:30-17:00 Coffee break with fortune telling
TRANSLATIONAL VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY MODELS - ANIMAL MODELS
Moderators: Isabelle Schwartz & Milica Kovačević Filipović
17:00-17:25
Nicola Mason

Nicola Mason is a Professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences and Advanced Medicine and holds the Paul A. James and Charles A. Gilmore Endowed Chair Professorship at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. She received her veterinary degree from the Royal Veterinary College, London and her Immunology PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. She performed her post -doctoral fellowship at the Abramson Cancer Center at the School of Medicine at UPenn.

Dr. Mason’s translational research group focuses on developing safe and effective immunotherapies for dogs with cancer, autoimmunity and infectious disease. Through comparative medicine her work aims to accelerate the clinical implementation of effective immunotherapies into the human and canine clinics, improving the lives of both species. Dr. Mason leads the first canine cancer immunotherapy consortium, supported by the Biden Cancer Moonshot initiative and her research is funded through multiple federal grants. Her pioneering work with a live, recombinant Listeria vaccine in dogs with osteosarcoma earned her the One Health Award for Excellence in promoting One Health Initiatives. Her research interests include adoptive immunotherapy using CAR-T cells in B cell malignancies, glioblastoma and OSA and the development of antibodies for treatment of cancer, autoimmunity and infectious disease.

 

 

 


Nicola Mason

Nicola Mason is a Professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences and Advanced Medicine and holds the Paul A. James and Charles A. Gilmore Endowed Chair Professorship at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. She received her veterinary degree from the Royal Veterinary College, London and her Immunology PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. She performed her post -doctoral fellowship at the Abramson Cancer Center at the School of Medicine at UPenn.

Dr. Mason’s translational research group focuses on developing safe and effective immunotherapies for dogs with cancer, autoimmunity and infectious disease. Through comparative medicine her work aims to accelerate the clinical implementation of effective immunotherapies into the human and canine clinics, improving the lives of both species. Dr. Mason leads the first canine cancer immunotherapy consortium, supported by the Biden Cancer Moonshot initiative and her research is funded through multiple federal grants. Her pioneering work with a live, recombinant Listeria vaccine in dogs with osteosarcoma earned her the One Health Award for Excellence in promoting One Health Initiatives. Her research interests include adoptive immunotherapy using CAR-T cells in B cell malignancies, glioblastoma and OSA and the development of antibodies for treatment of cancer, autoimmunity and infectious disease.

 

 

 

Nicola Mason, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, USA: “Developing CAR-T cell therapies for dogs with B cell malignancies”
17:30-17:56
Sabine Riffault

Dr Sabine Riffault originally trained in agronomy (diploma in 1993) has obtained her PhD in immunology in 1997. She has been appointed researcher in the department of Animal Health at INRAE in 1997 and has been working since as an immunologist specialized on farm animal viral diseases. After a sabbatical at Imperial College (London, UK) in the group of Prof. Peter Openshaw, she started studying the immune responses against the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) affecting young calves (bovine RSV) or infants (human RSV) and causing acute respiratory diseases. Her research interests are now focused on the immune system of the newborn animal to enhance vaccine efficacy or boost innate immune defenses in this particular period of life. She holds 46 publications in peer-reviewed journals, and 5 patents.

Sabine Riffault is also the head of the department "Molecular Virology and Immunology" at INRAE since 2015. This research department of about 95 people comprises 6 research teams working on respiratory zoonotic/emerging/endemic animal viruses, fish viruses and bacteria and prion diseases (https://www6.jouy.inrae.fr/vim).


Sabine Riffault

Dr Sabine Riffault originally trained in agronomy (diploma in 1993) has obtained her PhD in immunology in 1997. She has been appointed researcher in the department of Animal Health at INRAE in 1997 and has been working since as an immunologist specialized on farm animal viral diseases. After a sabbatical at Imperial College (London, UK) in the group of Prof. Peter Openshaw, she started studying the immune responses against the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) affecting young calves (bovine RSV) or infants (human RSV) and causing acute respiratory diseases. Her research interests are now focused on the immune system of the newborn animal to enhance vaccine efficacy or boost innate immune defenses in this particular period of life. She holds 46 publications in peer-reviewed journals, and 5 patents.

Sabine Riffault is also the head of the department "Molecular Virology and Immunology" at INRAE since 2015. This research department of about 95 people comprises 6 research teams working on respiratory zoonotic/emerging/endemic animal viruses, fish viruses and bacteria and prion diseases (https://www6.jouy.inrae.fr/vim).

Sabine Riffault, Virologie et Immunologie Moléculaires, INREA, France: “Efficacy of PreF subunit BRSV vaccine in calves: a translational model for infant vaccination?”
18:00-18:07
Tobias Kaeser

Dr. Kaeser is an Assistant Professor in Swine immunology at the North Carolina State University with additional expertise in molecular biology, microbiology, and vaccinology. He combines i) in vivo sensitization or vaccination and challenge trials with ii) antigen-specific in vitro restimulations and iii) multiple analysis technologies such as ELISA/ELISpot, qPCR, NanoString, fluorescent immunohistochemistry, and multi-color flow cytometry. While the immunological toolbox has previously been limited for swine, he thereby overcomes this limitation and provides the biologically highly relevant swine model a state-of-the-art analysis platform. This combination makes swine an excellent animal model for biomedical research. Hence, in addition to promoting swine health by driving vaccine research for the major pig pathogen PRRSV, he uses swine as a biomedical animal model to not only study the food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) but also the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia trachomatis. His long-term goals for are to develop prevention strategies against both diseases.


Tobias Kaeser

Dr. Kaeser is an Assistant Professor in Swine immunology at the North Carolina State University with additional expertise in molecular biology, microbiology, and vaccinology. He combines i) in vivo sensitization or vaccination and challenge trials with ii) antigen-specific in vitro restimulations and iii) multiple analysis technologies such as ELISA/ELISpot, qPCR, NanoString, fluorescent immunohistochemistry, and multi-color flow cytometry. While the immunological toolbox has previously been limited for swine, he thereby overcomes this limitation and provides the biologically highly relevant swine model a state-of-the-art analysis platform. This combination makes swine an excellent animal model for biomedical research. Hence, in addition to promoting swine health by driving vaccine research for the major pig pathogen PRRSV, he uses swine as a biomedical animal model to not only study the food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) but also the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia trachomatis. His long-term goals for are to develop prevention strategies against both diseases.

Tobias Kaeser, North Carolina State University, USA: “Establishment of outbred pre-exposed pigs as an animal model for Chlamydia trachomatis vaccine development”
18:10-18:17
Tobias Kaeser

Dr. Kaeser is an Assistant Professor in Swine immunology at the North Carolina State University with additional expertise in molecular biology, microbiology, and vaccinology. He combines i) in vivo sensitization or vaccination and challenge trials with ii) antigen-specific in vitro restimulations and iii) multiple analysis technologies such as ELISA/ELISpot, qPCR, NanoString, fluorescent immunohistochemistry, and multi-color flow cytometry. While the immunological toolbox has previously been limited for swine, he thereby overcomes this limitation and provides the biologically highly relevant swine model a state-of-the-art analysis platform. This combination makes swine an excellent animal model for biomedical research. Hence, in addition to promoting swine health by driving vaccine research for the major pig pathogen PRRSV, he uses swine as a biomedical animal model to not only study the food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) but also the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia trachomatis. His long-term goals for are to develop prevention strategies against both diseases.


Tobias Kaeser

Dr. Kaeser is an Assistant Professor in Swine immunology at the North Carolina State University with additional expertise in molecular biology, microbiology, and vaccinology. He combines i) in vivo sensitization or vaccination and challenge trials with ii) antigen-specific in vitro restimulations and iii) multiple analysis technologies such as ELISA/ELISpot, qPCR, NanoString, fluorescent immunohistochemistry, and multi-color flow cytometry. While the immunological toolbox has previously been limited for swine, he thereby overcomes this limitation and provides the biologically highly relevant swine model a state-of-the-art analysis platform. This combination makes swine an excellent animal model for biomedical research. Hence, in addition to promoting swine health by driving vaccine research for the major pig pathogen PRRSV, he uses swine as a biomedical animal model to not only study the food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) but also the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia trachomatis. His long-term goals for are to develop prevention strategies against both diseases.

Tobias Kaeser, North Carolina State University, USA: “Domestic pigs represent a novel translational animal model for eosinophilic esophagitis”
18:20-18:27
Jérôme Estephan

Jérôme Estephan is a thoracic and cardiovascular Surgeon. He studied at Paris Saclay University, learnt theorical anatomy, human physiology, histopathology, pharmacology, and practised medecine since 2011. Then, he specialized in General Surgery after his last medical competition in 2016. Finally, he specialized in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery in 2018. He has practised at different centers specialized in lung transplantation, especially Foch Hospital, Suresnes France.

With his surgical tricks and his knowledge about extracorporeal circulation and lung transplantation, he participated at many projects in the Team of V2I (Vaccins Immunology Immunomodulation) on the center of INRAE (Institut National de recherche en agriculture, en alimentation et environnement) in Jouy en Josas France. These projects involved the Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion, and the way to improve survival on clinical lung transplantation. The pig is the animal mostly used for these projects because of the clinical translation.

 


Jérôme Estephan

Jérôme Estephan is a thoracic and cardiovascular Surgeon. He studied at Paris Saclay University, learnt theorical anatomy, human physiology, histopathology, pharmacology, and practised medecine since 2011. Then, he specialized in General Surgery after his last medical competition in 2016. Finally, he specialized in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery in 2018. He has practised at different centers specialized in lung transplantation, especially Foch Hospital, Suresnes France.

With his surgical tricks and his knowledge about extracorporeal circulation and lung transplantation, he participated at many projects in the Team of V2I (Vaccins Immunology Immunomodulation) on the center of INRAE (Institut National de recherche en agriculture, en alimentation et environnement) in Jouy en Josas France. These projects involved the Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion, and the way to improve survival on clinical lung transplantation. The pig is the animal mostly used for these projects because of the clinical translation.

 

Jérôme Estephan, Université Paris-Saclay, INRAE, Jouy-en-Josas, France: “A cross-circulation approach for tuning the initial dialogue between recipient leukocytes and donor lung graft cells in the pig preclinical model.”
Parallel Sessions B
Monday, 30 August 2021
FISH IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Uwe Fischer & Dušan Palić
15:00-15:20
Pierre Boudinot

Dr Boudinot is a fish and comparative immunologist at INRAE (France). His team develops comparative approaches to understand host-virus interactions in fish, and the evolution of B and T cell repertoires. His group at the INRAE focuses on mechanisms of antiviral immunity in fish (salmonids and zebrafish), the structure of immune repertoires in healthy, infected and vaccinated salmonids, and the development of disease models in zebrafish. 

He is interested in the mechanisms of the type I IFN response induced by the viral infection in fish, in the evolution and functions of Interferon stimulated genes, as well as in the evolution of MHC and genetic resistance to viral diseases. Dr. Boudinot focused on B and T cell responses at the cell population level using repertoire sequencing approaches, aiming at understanding the role of public and private responses in the protection afforded by antiviral vaccines in salmonids.  Also, Dr Boudinot has been involved in the characterization of zebrafish inflammatory and immune responses against pathogens using the genetic resources of this fish model species with translational value human and fish health.


Pierre Boudinot

Dr Boudinot is a fish and comparative immunologist at INRAE (France). His team develops comparative approaches to understand host-virus interactions in fish, and the evolution of B and T cell repertoires. His group at the INRAE focuses on mechanisms of antiviral immunity in fish (salmonids and zebrafish), the structure of immune repertoires in healthy, infected and vaccinated salmonids, and the development of disease models in zebrafish. 

He is interested in the mechanisms of the type I IFN response induced by the viral infection in fish, in the evolution and functions of Interferon stimulated genes, as well as in the evolution of MHC and genetic resistance to viral diseases. Dr. Boudinot focused on B and T cell responses at the cell population level using repertoire sequencing approaches, aiming at understanding the role of public and private responses in the protection afforded by antiviral vaccines in salmonids.  Also, Dr Boudinot has been involved in the characterization of zebrafish inflammatory and immune responses against pathogens using the genetic resources of this fish model species with translational value human and fish health.

Pierre Boudinot, French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE), France: “Antiviral public antibody responses in fish ”
15:25-15:35
Sofie Barsøe

Sofie Barsøe is a veterinarian with an interest in prevention of infectious diseases through vaccination. She graduated as a veterinarian (DVM) in 2014 and has worked with infectious diseases of fur animals first at the Swedish veterinary Institute and afterwards in a medical company advicing on vaccination programs and conducting clinical studies. In 2017 she started a PhD at Technical University of Denmark, in the fish vaccinology group. The aim of the PhD project is to evaluate an experimental VLP vaccine candidate for protection of European sea bass against Viral Nervous Necrosis. She is handing in her thesis in september 2021 and afterwards hopes to continue her career in the industry.

2017 - 2021: PhD student at Technical University of Denmark, fish vaccinology group. Supervioser: Prof. Niels Lorenzen

2014 - 2017: Product Specialist, Nordvacc Läkemidel.

2014 - 2014: Assisting State Veterinarian, Swedish Veterinary Institute 

2014: cand. med. vet/DVM/Veterinarian


Sofie Barsøe

Sofie Barsøe is a veterinarian with an interest in prevention of infectious diseases through vaccination. She graduated as a veterinarian (DVM) in 2014 and has worked with infectious diseases of fur animals first at the Swedish veterinary Institute and afterwards in a medical company advicing on vaccination programs and conducting clinical studies. In 2017 she started a PhD at Technical University of Denmark, in the fish vaccinology group. The aim of the PhD project is to evaluate an experimental VLP vaccine candidate for protection of European sea bass against Viral Nervous Necrosis. She is handing in her thesis in september 2021 and afterwards hopes to continue her career in the industry.

2017 - 2021: PhD student at Technical University of Denmark, fish vaccinology group. Supervioser: Prof. Niels Lorenzen

2014 - 2017: Product Specialist, Nordvacc Läkemidel.

2014 - 2014: Assisting State Veterinarian, Swedish Veterinary Institute 

2014: cand. med. vet/DVM/Veterinarian

Sofie Barsøe, Technical University of Denmark, National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark: “Evaluation of a VLP-based vaccine for European sea bass: Serologic response, immune gene-expression profile and long-term protection in experimental challenge”
15:38-15:48
Makesh Marappan

Makesh Marappan, ICAR-Central Institute of Brackishwater Aquaculture, India


Makesh Marappan

Makesh Marappan, ICAR-Central Institute of Brackishwater Aquaculture, India

Makesh Marappan, ICAR-Central Institute of Brackishwater Aquaculture, India: “Immune response of Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) vaccinated with recombinant viral nervous necrosis vaccine”
15:51-16:01
Marek Ratvaj

Marek Ratvaj, DVM

Master thesis focused on probiotic supplement for bees as a mean of prevention of infection and increasing of yield.

Since 2019 PhD student at University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy with work focusing on development of novel probiotic feed for salmonid fish in cooperation with Mendel University in Brno, Veterinary and Pharmacy University in Brno and Nord University in Bodo.


Marek Ratvaj

Marek Ratvaj, DVM

Master thesis focused on probiotic supplement for bees as a mean of prevention of infection and increasing of yield.

Since 2019 PhD student at University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy with work focusing on development of novel probiotic feed for salmonid fish in cooperation with Mendel University in Brno, Veterinary and Pharmacy University in Brno and Nord University in Bodo.

Marek Ratvaj, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Košice, Slovakia: “Changes in gene expression of immunologically important molecules after application of autochtonous probiotic in rainbow trout ”
16:04-16:14
Dusan Palic

Prof. Dr Dušan Palić, D.V.M., MVSc, Ph.D., Dipl. ECAAH, CertAqV, Professor and Chair of Fish Diseases and Fisheries Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich.

Professor Palić comes from a long line of veterinarians and educators, being the third generation Professor of Veterinary Medicine. He received D.V.M. and MVSc degrees from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Belgrade, Serbia, and Ph.D. from Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine. He is a founding member, certified aquatic veterinarian (CertAqV), and Past President of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association. Prof. Palić is also a founding diplomate of the European College of Aquatic Animal Health (ECAAH). He is the Director of the International Aquatic Veterinary Biosecurity Consortium and senior aquatic animal health expert for Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations. He represents academia and organized aquatic veterinary profession in the FishMedPlus Coalition that was established by Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE) upon request from European Medicine Agency (EMA), with the goal to improve access and availability of veterinary medical products, including vaccines, to the E.U. aquaculture industry. On the global education front, Prof. Palić is a member of the project team that is developing a model curriculum for day-1 competency in aquatic veterinary medicine. His daily work as Chair for Fish Diseases at LMU Munich includes research in innate immunity of aquatic animals, teaching aquatic veterinary medicine, as well as diagnostic and extension services.


Dusan Palic

Prof. Dr Dušan Palić, D.V.M., MVSc, Ph.D., Dipl. ECAAH, CertAqV, Professor and Chair of Fish Diseases and Fisheries Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich.

Professor Palić comes from a long line of veterinarians and educators, being the third generation Professor of Veterinary Medicine. He received D.V.M. and MVSc degrees from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Belgrade, Serbia, and Ph.D. from Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine. He is a founding member, certified aquatic veterinarian (CertAqV), and Past President of the World Aquatic Veterinary Medical Association. Prof. Palić is also a founding diplomate of the European College of Aquatic Animal Health (ECAAH). He is the Director of the International Aquatic Veterinary Biosecurity Consortium and senior aquatic animal health expert for Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations. He represents academia and organized aquatic veterinary profession in the FishMedPlus Coalition that was established by Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE) upon request from European Medicine Agency (EMA), with the goal to improve access and availability of veterinary medical products, including vaccines, to the E.U. aquaculture industry. On the global education front, Prof. Palić is a member of the project team that is developing a model curriculum for day-1 competency in aquatic veterinary medicine. His daily work as Chair for Fish Diseases at LMU Munich includes research in innate immunity of aquatic animals, teaching aquatic veterinary medicine, as well as diagnostic and extension services.

Dusan Palic, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Germany: “Organically modified clinoptilolite (MINAZEL-PLUS®) modulates innate immune responses in tilapia (O. niloticus)”
16:17-16:27
Uwe Fischer

Uwe Fischer graduated from the Moscow Veterinary Academy with a diploma thesis on ovine parasitology. His PhD thesis (Leipzig University) dealt with swine fever virus pathogenesis while his habilitation was on fish immune responses and fish health (Rostock University). At the Rostock University, he gives lectures on fish pathology and fish immunology. Uwe undertook two postdoctoral fellowships in Japan working on cell-mediated cytotoxicity in fish in Prof. Nakanishi’s lab at the National Research Institute of Aquaculture. At present, Uwe is the deputy head of the Institute of Infectology (IMED) at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Federal Research Institute of Animal Health, Island Riems, which is an independent higher federal authority under the German Federal Ministry for Food and Agriculture.

At IMED, Uwe leads the working group on fish health and runs the laboratory of fish immunology.

The main research interest of Uwe’s group is cell-mediated immune responses to viral and bacterial pathogens in fish. This includes analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity, the development of tools for the detection of genes and molecules expressed during cell-mediated immune reactions, as well as the investigation of tools capable of triggering cell-mediated immune responses during infection and vaccination. At present, he focuses on antigen uptake through mucosal surfaces for the development of mucosal (oral and bath) vaccines.

Uwe’s lab also hosts the National Reference Laboratories for two notifiable fish (Infectious Salmon Anaemia, Epizootic Haematopoietic Necrosis)  and three notifiable crustacean (White Spot Disease, Yellow Head Disease, Taura Syndrome) diseases.


Uwe Fischer

Uwe Fischer graduated from the Moscow Veterinary Academy with a diploma thesis on ovine parasitology. His PhD thesis (Leipzig University) dealt with swine fever virus pathogenesis while his habilitation was on fish immune responses and fish health (Rostock University). At the Rostock University, he gives lectures on fish pathology and fish immunology. Uwe undertook two postdoctoral fellowships in Japan working on cell-mediated cytotoxicity in fish in Prof. Nakanishi’s lab at the National Research Institute of Aquaculture. At present, Uwe is the deputy head of the Institute of Infectology (IMED) at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Federal Research Institute of Animal Health, Island Riems, which is an independent higher federal authority under the German Federal Ministry for Food and Agriculture.

At IMED, Uwe leads the working group on fish health and runs the laboratory of fish immunology.

The main research interest of Uwe’s group is cell-mediated immune responses to viral and bacterial pathogens in fish. This includes analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity, the development of tools for the detection of genes and molecules expressed during cell-mediated immune reactions, as well as the investigation of tools capable of triggering cell-mediated immune responses during infection and vaccination. At present, he focuses on antigen uptake through mucosal surfaces for the development of mucosal (oral and bath) vaccines.

Uwe’s lab also hosts the National Reference Laboratories for two notifiable fish (Infectious Salmon Anaemia, Epizootic Haematopoietic Necrosis)  and three notifiable crustacean (White Spot Disease, Yellow Head Disease, Taura Syndrome) diseases.

Uwe Fischer, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute, Insel Riems, Germany: “Ancient features of the interleukin-2, -15 and -15-like (15L) cytokine family, and the first identification of IL-15L functions”
16:30-17:00 Coffee break with fortune telling
AVIAN IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Tina Dalgaard & Lonneke Vervelde
17:00-17:20
Mike Kogut

Dr. Kogut is a Research Microbiologist and Lead Scientist within the Food and Feed Safety research Unit at the Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, College Station, TX, USA.  Dr. Kogut has published over 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers,11 book chapters, and has received 5 patents.  Dr. Kogut’s research is centered on gut health of poultry and alternatives to antibiotics to control disease and increase production.  Specifically, Dr. Kogut’s research has concentrated on the development of cost-effective immunological interventions to improve gut health by studying the role of the microbiota in immunity to infection; the role of dietary metabolites in promoting immune regulation and immune responses to pathogens; tissue specific regulatory responses to infection; characterizing novel molecular targets that mediate the actions of dietary compounds and botanicals in inflammation and immunity; investigating how diet modulates the gut microbiome and mucosal immune responses; and understanding the integration of central metabolic pathways and nutrient sensing with antimicrobial immunity and how it alters cellular energy homeostasis and contributes to the prevention or resolution of infectious diseases. 


Mike Kogut

Dr. Kogut is a Research Microbiologist and Lead Scientist within the Food and Feed Safety research Unit at the Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, College Station, TX, USA.  Dr. Kogut has published over 200 peer-reviewed scientific papers,11 book chapters, and has received 5 patents.  Dr. Kogut’s research is centered on gut health of poultry and alternatives to antibiotics to control disease and increase production.  Specifically, Dr. Kogut’s research has concentrated on the development of cost-effective immunological interventions to improve gut health by studying the role of the microbiota in immunity to infection; the role of dietary metabolites in promoting immune regulation and immune responses to pathogens; tissue specific regulatory responses to infection; characterizing novel molecular targets that mediate the actions of dietary compounds and botanicals in inflammation and immunity; investigating how diet modulates the gut microbiome and mucosal immune responses; and understanding the integration of central metabolic pathways and nutrient sensing with antimicrobial immunity and how it alters cellular energy homeostasis and contributes to the prevention or resolution of infectious diseases. 

Mike Kogut, USDA, USA: “Influence of the intestinal immunity-microbiota interactome on regulating poultry health: Homeostasis vs Chronic Inflammation”
17:26-17:46
Sonja Härtle

Sonja Härtle studied veterinary medicine in Munich. She worked for her doctoral thesis about “Characterization of chBAFF as an important regulator of B cell function in the chicken”in Bernd Kasper’s lab. Following her thesis, she spent a research fellowship at Mike Ratcliffe’s lab at the University of Toronto. Back in Munich she habilitated for Animal Physiology with the research project “Establishing functional genomic to study development and function of the avian immune system” and became an assistant professor at the Department of Veterinary Sciences at the LMU Munich.

Her main research focus is the development and differentiation of chicken B cells with a special interest of involved chemokines and cytokines. This work could demonstrate the importance of CXCL12 and BAFF for developing B cells in the bursa of Fabricius. In addition, the findings enabled the establishment of a culture system for chicken B cells, which can now be used to study interaction of B cells and B cell trophic viruses like Mareks disease virus (MDV).


Sonja Härtle

Sonja Härtle studied veterinary medicine in Munich. She worked for her doctoral thesis about “Characterization of chBAFF as an important regulator of B cell function in the chicken”in Bernd Kasper’s lab. Following her thesis, she spent a research fellowship at Mike Ratcliffe’s lab at the University of Toronto. Back in Munich she habilitated for Animal Physiology with the research project “Establishing functional genomic to study development and function of the avian immune system” and became an assistant professor at the Department of Veterinary Sciences at the LMU Munich.

Her main research focus is the development and differentiation of chicken B cells with a special interest of involved chemokines and cytokines. This work could demonstrate the importance of CXCL12 and BAFF for developing B cells in the bursa of Fabricius. In addition, the findings enabled the establishment of a culture system for chicken B cells, which can now be used to study interaction of B cells and B cell trophic viruses like Mareks disease virus (MDV).

Sonja Härtle, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany: “New insights into chicken B cell development”
17:51-17:59
Tessa Nash

Tessa Nash just completed her PhD at The Roslin Institute & RDSVS, University of Edinburgh and is staying on as a Senior Clinical Training Scholar in Small Animal Medicine. Her iCASE studentship was based in Prof. Vervelde’s lab in the Division of Infection and Immunity and was jointly funded by the BBSRC and MSD Animal Health. Tessa qualified from Edinburgh University in 2009 with a Veterinary degree and a Masters in Veterinary Science by Research. Tessa worked as an Advancer Practitioner in small animal medicine after university and has a strong interest in intestinal and host-pathogen research. She was enticed back to academia by a PhD focused on developing a novel in vitro model to study poultry gut health and disease. The characterisation and host-pathogen research applications of the resultant apical-out leukocyte-containing organoid model were published in Communications Biology this year and will be discussed at the conference.


Tessa Nash

Tessa Nash just completed her PhD at The Roslin Institute & RDSVS, University of Edinburgh and is staying on as a Senior Clinical Training Scholar in Small Animal Medicine. Her iCASE studentship was based in Prof. Vervelde’s lab in the Division of Infection and Immunity and was jointly funded by the BBSRC and MSD Animal Health. Tessa qualified from Edinburgh University in 2009 with a Veterinary degree and a Masters in Veterinary Science by Research. Tessa worked as an Advancer Practitioner in small animal medicine after university and has a strong interest in intestinal and host-pathogen research. She was enticed back to academia by a PhD focused on developing a novel in vitro model to study poultry gut health and disease. The characterisation and host-pathogen research applications of the resultant apical-out leukocyte-containing organoid model were published in Communications Biology this year and will be discussed at the conference.

Tessa Nash, The Roslin Institute, United Kingdom: “Inside-out chicken enteroids with leukocyte component as a model to study host–pathogen interactions”
18:02-18:10Carlotta de Luca, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria: “Local immune response provided by fowl adenovirus (FAdV) fiber vaccine plays a key role in protecting chickens from hepatitis-hydropericardium syndrome (HHS)”
18:13-18:21
Adam Balić

Adam Balic is a Group Leader at the Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.

My group’s research has focused on answering fundamental questions on how the chicken immune system develops and functions, and the translation of this knowledge into animal health, economic and societal benefits. We specialise in the development and application of gene editing technologies to produce transgenic/gene edited lines of chickens as tools to advance immunological research. My groups overall aim in to harness the biology of chicken dendritic cells to improve poultry vaccination outcomes and selective breeding of heathy chickens. My group has produced novel chicken conventional dendritic cell markers and several unique lines of gene edited chickens, including a dendritic cell transgenic reporter line. To my knowledge, this is the first immune cell lineage specific transgenic reporter line of chickens produced in the world. The ability to visualise chicken dendritic cells is incredibly valuable to basic immunology research, but we have also produced gene edited lines of chickens that will enable the manipulation of dendritic cell development and function.

 


Adam Balić

Adam Balic is a Group Leader at the Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.

My group’s research has focused on answering fundamental questions on how the chicken immune system develops and functions, and the translation of this knowledge into animal health, economic and societal benefits. We specialise in the development and application of gene editing technologies to produce transgenic/gene edited lines of chickens as tools to advance immunological research. My groups overall aim in to harness the biology of chicken dendritic cells to improve poultry vaccination outcomes and selective breeding of heathy chickens. My group has produced novel chicken conventional dendritic cell markers and several unique lines of gene edited chickens, including a dendritic cell transgenic reporter line. To my knowledge, this is the first immune cell lineage specific transgenic reporter line of chickens produced in the world. The ability to visualise chicken dendritic cells is incredibly valuable to basic immunology research, but we have also produced gene edited lines of chickens that will enable the manipulation of dendritic cell development and function.

 

Adam Balić, The Roslin Institute, United Kingdom: “Characterising chicken XCR1+ conventional dendritic cell using unique gene edited models ”
18:24-18:32Elie Ngantcha, Service of Avian Virology and Immunology, Sciensano, Belgium: “Characterization of chicken monocyte-derived dendritic cells generated ex vivo”
Plenary Sessions
Tuesday, 31 August 2021
VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY TOOLKIT – SPONSORED BY VETERINARY RESEARCH
Moderators: Jayne Hope & William Mwangi
09:57-09:59
Tuesday good morning movie

Tuesday good morning movie
Tuesday good morning movie, National Tourism Organisation of Serbia: “See Serbia”
10:00-10:20
Michele Miller

Prof. Michele Miller, DVM, MS, MPH, PhD, Diplm. ECZM (ZHM)

Michele received her MS and PhD in Immunology, and DVM from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Masters’ in Public Health (MPH) at the University of Florida-Gainesville.  She is also a diplomate of the European College of Zoological Medicine.  She did her post-doctoral training at San Diego Zoo, then went onto work at several zoos in the U.S. (Los Angeles Zoo, Busch Gardens, Disney’s Animal Kingdom, Palm Beach Zoo), including being a Veterinary Manager at Disney’s Animal Kingdom.  She moved to South Africa in 2013 and is currently the NRF South African Research Chair in Animal TB at Stellenbosch University, although she is based full-time in Kruger National Park.

Michele is actively involved in wildlife research, particularly focusing on TB, immobilization physiology and immunology.  She is past president of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, current veterinary advisor for hippopotamus and rhinoceros for the Association of Zoos and Aquariums in the U.S., and the Chair of the Wildlife TB Study Group in South Africa.  She works with veterinarians at zoos and private facilities around the world.


Michele Miller

Prof. Michele Miller, DVM, MS, MPH, PhD, Diplm. ECZM (ZHM)

Michele received her MS and PhD in Immunology, and DVM from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Masters’ in Public Health (MPH) at the University of Florida-Gainesville.  She is also a diplomate of the European College of Zoological Medicine.  She did her post-doctoral training at San Diego Zoo, then went onto work at several zoos in the U.S. (Los Angeles Zoo, Busch Gardens, Disney’s Animal Kingdom, Palm Beach Zoo), including being a Veterinary Manager at Disney’s Animal Kingdom.  She moved to South Africa in 2013 and is currently the NRF South African Research Chair in Animal TB at Stellenbosch University, although she is based full-time in Kruger National Park.

Michele is actively involved in wildlife research, particularly focusing on TB, immobilization physiology and immunology.  She is past president of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, current veterinary advisor for hippopotamus and rhinoceros for the Association of Zoos and Aquariums in the U.S., and the Chair of the Wildlife TB Study Group in South Africa.  She works with veterinarians at zoos and private facilities around the world.

Michele Miller, Stellenbosch University, South Africa: “Developing Immunological Tools for Wildlife – We don’t have to recreate the wheel!”
10:25-10:45
Hege Lund

Dr. Hege Lund received her DVM from Szent István University in Budapest and her PhD in immunology from the School of Veterinary Science, now Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at The Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Her PhD focused on innate immune responses in cattle, describing the activation and recirculation of bovine natural killer cells. She continued her postdoctoral training in the Immunology unit at the VET faculty, developing assays for measuring vaccine responses in Atlantic salmon, and is now appointed Associate Professor in the same group. Her research activities are centered on immune responses of farmed salmon, where she is involved in the development of tools for assessment of the immune competence of Atlantic salmon smolts and growers. She is currently leading a project aimed at establishing multiplex immunoassay technology for measuring biomarkers of inflammation and stress in salmon. Dr Lund is also interested in the interactions between host physiology and immune responsiveness in determining the outcome of stress and various infections affecting farmed salmon.


Hege Lund

Dr. Hege Lund received her DVM from Szent István University in Budapest and her PhD in immunology from the School of Veterinary Science, now Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at The Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Her PhD focused on innate immune responses in cattle, describing the activation and recirculation of bovine natural killer cells. She continued her postdoctoral training in the Immunology unit at the VET faculty, developing assays for measuring vaccine responses in Atlantic salmon, and is now appointed Associate Professor in the same group. Her research activities are centered on immune responses of farmed salmon, where she is involved in the development of tools for assessment of the immune competence of Atlantic salmon smolts and growers. She is currently leading a project aimed at establishing multiplex immunoassay technology for measuring biomarkers of inflammation and stress in salmon. Dr Lund is also interested in the interactions between host physiology and immune responsiveness in determining the outcome of stress and various infections affecting farmed salmon.

Hege Lund, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway: “Identification of inflammatory biomarkers in Atlantic salmon by a plasma proteomic approach. Can blood biomarkers be used to predict cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS)-related mortality risk in farmed fish?”
10:50-10:57Jordan Mitchell, School of Veterinary Studies and The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom: “Mycobacteriosis in Felidae: Generation of recombinant interferon-gamma from different Felidae species, and recognition by cat-specific anti-interferon-gamma antibodies”
11:00-11:07
Eduard Roos

Eduard Roos obtained his undergraduate BSc Zoology and BSc Zoology (Hons) form the University of Pretoria (2013) and the University of the Free-State (2014), respectively. He then obtained a PhD in Molecular Biology from Stellenbosch University (2018). His PhD focused on developing diagnostic assays to detect Mycobacterium bovis in warthogs. In 2019 he joined the Immunogenetics research group as a Postdoctoral Scientist at The Pirbright Institute. His Postdoctoral research focuses on the development and application optimised multiplex immunofluorescent panels in cattle.


Eduard Roos

Eduard Roos obtained his undergraduate BSc Zoology and BSc Zoology (Hons) form the University of Pretoria (2013) and the University of the Free-State (2014), respectively. He then obtained a PhD in Molecular Biology from Stellenbosch University (2018). His PhD focused on developing diagnostic assays to detect Mycobacterium bovis in warthogs. In 2019 he joined the Immunogenetics research group as a Postdoctoral Scientist at The Pirbright Institute. His Postdoctoral research focuses on the development and application optimised multiplex immunofluorescent panels in cattle.

Eduard Roos, The Pirbright Institute, United Kingdom: “The development of two optimised multicolour immunofluorescence panels to deep phenotype cattle B and T cells and their application to a FMDV vaccination study”
11:10-11:17
Roosheel Patel

Roosheel Patel is currently a PhD student in the labs of Brad Rosenberg and Dusan Bogunovic at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.  Before starting this PhD, in 2017, Roosheel completed a Master’s in Biomedical Sciences in the Rosenberg Lab, where he developed single cell RNA-sequencing analysis strategies to characterize horse peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition to generating an equine peripheral blood immune cell atlas, Roosheel’s work extended to other questions in equine biology including characterizing the equine immune response to viral infection, and characterizing the heterogeneity in equine mesenchymal stromal cells. In 2019, Roosheel matriculated into the PhD program at Mount Sinai, where inspired by patients with inborn errors of immunity, he aims to leverage high throughput genomics technologies to study antiviral gene networks.


Roosheel Patel

Roosheel Patel is currently a PhD student in the labs of Brad Rosenberg and Dusan Bogunovic at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.  Before starting this PhD, in 2017, Roosheel completed a Master’s in Biomedical Sciences in the Rosenberg Lab, where he developed single cell RNA-sequencing analysis strategies to characterize horse peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition to generating an equine peripheral blood immune cell atlas, Roosheel’s work extended to other questions in equine biology including characterizing the equine immune response to viral infection, and characterizing the heterogeneity in equine mesenchymal stromal cells. In 2019, Roosheel matriculated into the PhD program at Mount Sinai, where inspired by patients with inborn errors of immunity, he aims to leverage high throughput genomics technologies to study antiviral gene networks.

Roosheel Patel, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA: “Developing a single cell resolution landscape of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells”
11:20-11:27
Joan Lunney

Dr. Joan Lunney is a Supervisory Research Scientist and an internationally recognized authority on pig immunology and genomics. Her lab is located at the USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC) in Beltsville, MD USA. Her current research focuses on swine immunology, genomics, and resistance to diseases, particularly to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). She coleads the US PRRS Host Genomics Consortium (PHGC) which assesses the role of genetics in determining pig resistance and susceptibility to PRRS virus infection. The PHGC effort has been expanded to functional genomics and proteomics as well as to a pregnant gilt model of PRRS virus infection.

Dr. Lunney has led international workshops characterizing monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive against swine cell subset, or CD, antigens and immune proteins, the cytokines and chemokines. She coled Swine Immune Toolkit efforts aimed at developing new mAbs, immune reagents and quantitative assays for assessment of pig health and vaccine responses and for use in biomedical models of human health and disease.


Joan Lunney

Dr. Joan Lunney is a Supervisory Research Scientist and an internationally recognized authority on pig immunology and genomics. Her lab is located at the USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC) in Beltsville, MD USA. Her current research focuses on swine immunology, genomics, and resistance to diseases, particularly to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). She coleads the US PRRS Host Genomics Consortium (PHGC) which assesses the role of genetics in determining pig resistance and susceptibility to PRRS virus infection. The PHGC effort has been expanded to functional genomics and proteomics as well as to a pregnant gilt model of PRRS virus infection.

Dr. Lunney has led international workshops characterizing monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive against swine cell subset, or CD, antigens and immune proteins, the cytokines and chemokines. She coled Swine Immune Toolkit efforts aimed at developing new mAbs, immune reagents and quantitative assays for assessment of pig health and vaccine responses and for use in biomedical models of human health and disease.

Joan Lunney, Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, USDA, USA: “Generation and characterization of novel swine immune reagents for evaluating immune correlates for vaccines, infection, and biomedical research outcomes”
11:30-12:00 Coffee break with fortune telling
INNATE IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Femke Broere & Sabine Hammer
12:00-12:20
Cynthia Baldwin

Cynthia Baldwin received her PhD in immunology from the College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, in 1983. She subsequently spent 7 years at the International laboratory for Research on Animal Diseases (now ILRI) in Nairobi, Kenya before returning to the USA as a professor at Ohio State University and then, since 1994. at the University of Massachusetts. Her research has focused on cellular responses to bacterial and protozoan pathogens of humans and/or livestock including Brucella, Leptospira, Mycobacterum and Theileria. She has had a particular emphasis on the characterisation and function of bovine gamma delta T lymphocytes and the role of the T cell co-receptor known as WC1 or T19. In recent years she and her colleagues have expanded this to evaluate these important receptors in sheep, goats and swine. This research may influence the way we think about gamma delta T cells as players in both innate as well as adaptive immunity and potentially vaccine development.


Cynthia Baldwin

Cynthia Baldwin received her PhD in immunology from the College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, in 1983. She subsequently spent 7 years at the International laboratory for Research on Animal Diseases (now ILRI) in Nairobi, Kenya before returning to the USA as a professor at Ohio State University and then, since 1994. at the University of Massachusetts. Her research has focused on cellular responses to bacterial and protozoan pathogens of humans and/or livestock including Brucella, Leptospira, Mycobacterum and Theileria. She has had a particular emphasis on the characterisation and function of bovine gamma delta T lymphocytes and the role of the T cell co-receptor known as WC1 or T19. In recent years she and her colleagues have expanded this to evaluate these important receptors in sheep, goats and swine. This research may influence the way we think about gamma delta T cells as players in both innate as well as adaptive immunity and potentially vaccine development.

Cynthia Baldwin, Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Massachusetts, USA: “Gamma delta T cells span the innate and adaptive immune systems: focus on ruminants and pigs”
12:25-12:45
Stephanie Talker

Stephanie C. Talker is a staff scientist at the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) in Bern (Switzerland). She studied Veterinary Medicine in Vienna (Austria), where she investigated the porcine T-cell response to Influenza A virus infection. At the IVI in Bern, her research focuses on dendritic and monocytic cells of various species, including cattle, pig, horse, sheep, and goat, with a specialization on multicolor flow cytometry and transcriptomic analyses.

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3966-6251
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephanie-Talker


Stephanie Talker

Stephanie C. Talker is a staff scientist at the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) in Bern (Switzerland). She studied Veterinary Medicine in Vienna (Austria), where she investigated the porcine T-cell response to Influenza A virus infection. At the IVI in Bern, her research focuses on dendritic and monocytic cells of various species, including cattle, pig, horse, sheep, and goat, with a specialization on multicolor flow cytometry and transcriptomic analyses.

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3966-6251
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephanie-Talker

Stephanie Talker, Institute of Virology and Immunology and Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Switzerland: “The Who-is-Who of bovine dendritic cells: from subset identification to single-cell transcriptomics”
12:50-12:57
Isabelle Schwartz

Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil (DVM, PhD), a Chair-elect of EVIG, works at the French National Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) in France. She is the head of the “Vaccine, Viruses and Immunopathology” team in the Molecular Virology and Immunology department at INRA in Jouy-en-Josas, near Paris. Over the last 20 years, she has developed an expertise in the molecular and functional characterization of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in sheep and pigs, at homeostasis and during viral infections and she has worked on vaccine strategies targeting dendritic cells. Currently she is developing immunoregulatory strategies targeting macrophages and dendritic cells to improve lung transplant survival in the pig as a biomedical model.

 


Isabelle Schwartz

Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil (DVM, PhD), a Chair-elect of EVIG, works at the French National Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) in France. She is the head of the “Vaccine, Viruses and Immunopathology” team in the Molecular Virology and Immunology department at INRA in Jouy-en-Josas, near Paris. Over the last 20 years, she has developed an expertise in the molecular and functional characterization of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in sheep and pigs, at homeostasis and during viral infections and she has worked on vaccine strategies targeting dendritic cells. Currently she is developing immunoregulatory strategies targeting macrophages and dendritic cells to improve lung transplant survival in the pig as a biomedical model.

 

Isabelle Schwartz, Virologie et Immunologie Moléculaire, INRAE, Université Paris-Saclay, Jouy-en-Josas, France: “Pig lung macrophage and dendritic cell subset complexity revealed by multiparametric flow cytometry and single-cell RNA-seq”
13:00-13:07Nicole de Buhr, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany: “Suicidal and vital neutrophil extracellular trap formation in response to Streptococcus suis in cerebrospinal fluid in vitro and in vivo ”
13:10-13:17Elliot Steedman, APHA & University of Surrey, UK: “Dendritic cell responses associated with a live attenuated vaccine (C-strain), and E2 subunit vaccines E2 and E2 CD154 (Porvac) against classical swine fever virus.”
13:20-13:27
Kate Sutton

Dr. Kate Sutton is post-doctoral scientist in the Department of Infection and Immunity at The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh. Their research focuses on the fundamentals of Avian Immunology.

Kate received her PhD in Avian Immunology at The Roslin Institute before taking up a post-doctoral position based on chicken B cell development in LMU, Germany. Since then, Kate has returned to the Roslin Institute where their areas of research include examining the different lineage and functions of macrophages and dendritic cells in the spleen (oral presentation) and lung, host-pathogen interactions at the mucosal surface using 3D and 2D enteroids, M cells and vaccine targeting.

Recently Kate was involved in project aim at developing bovine 2D monolayers from 3D enteroids (poster presentation). Kate has skills in multi-colour flow cytometry, confocal microscopic analysis and in vitro culture systems.

Kate is a member of Comparative Veterinary Immunology Group which aims to bring together veterinary, human and mouse immunologists and provide a forum for discussion, collaboration and exchange of ideas.


Kate Sutton

Dr. Kate Sutton is post-doctoral scientist in the Department of Infection and Immunity at The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh. Their research focuses on the fundamentals of Avian Immunology.

Kate received her PhD in Avian Immunology at The Roslin Institute before taking up a post-doctoral position based on chicken B cell development in LMU, Germany. Since then, Kate has returned to the Roslin Institute where their areas of research include examining the different lineage and functions of macrophages and dendritic cells in the spleen (oral presentation) and lung, host-pathogen interactions at the mucosal surface using 3D and 2D enteroids, M cells and vaccine targeting.

Recently Kate was involved in project aim at developing bovine 2D monolayers from 3D enteroids (poster presentation). Kate has skills in multi-colour flow cytometry, confocal microscopic analysis and in vitro culture systems.

Kate is a member of Comparative Veterinary Immunology Group which aims to bring together veterinary, human and mouse immunologists and provide a forum for discussion, collaboration and exchange of ideas.

Kate Sutton, The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh: “Characterization of conventional dendritic cells and macrophages in the spleen using the CSF1R-reporter transgenic chickens”
13:30-15:00 Lunch break
Parallel Sessions A
Tuesday, 31 August 2021
TICK AND PARASITE IMMUNITY
Moderators: Robin Flynn & Laia Solano-Gallego
15:00-15:25
Andrew Williams

Andrew Williams obtained his BSc and PhD at the University of Western Australia in 2010, followed by postdoctoral positions at Oxford University and the University of Copenhagen. He was appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, University of Copenhagen, in 2015, and Associate Professor in 2017. His current work focuses on gastrointestinal parasite infection.  Particular areas of interest are host immunity and inflammation, and interactions between infection and host diet/microbiome and metabolic function. 


Andrew Williams

Andrew Williams obtained his BSc and PhD at the University of Western Australia in 2010, followed by postdoctoral positions at Oxford University and the University of Copenhagen. He was appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, University of Copenhagen, in 2015, and Associate Professor in 2017. His current work focuses on gastrointestinal parasite infection.  Particular areas of interest are host immunity and inflammation, and interactions between infection and host diet/microbiome and metabolic function. 

Andrew Williams, University of Copenhagen, Denmark: “Unraveling the role of diet and the microbiome on resistance to gastrointestinal helminth infection”
15:30-15:55Francesca Soutter, University of London, Royal Veterinary College, United Kingdom: “Protozoan vaccine development: A yeast-based vaccine against Eimeria tenella in chickens”
16:00-16:07Ismael Pereira, Universidad de Chile, La Pintana, Santiago, Chile: “Host species as a main factor involved in the differential expression of immune related genes of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto cysts protoscoleces”
16:10-16:17
Barbara Oliveira

Barbara Oliveira, Veterinarian graduated from the Federal University of Bahia (UFBA), Brazil (2014). Master of Science with an emphasis on Biotechnology in Health and Investigative Medicine by the Research Center Gonçalo Moniz (CPqGM), Foundation Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Brazil (2016). Obtained the recognition / equivalence / Master's degree in Veterinary Medicine by the Portuguese Institution, the Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar da Universidade do Porto (ICBAS-UP). Currently, is a PhD student in the Doctoral Program in Veterinary Sciences at the ICBAS | UP, funded by FCT, Portugal. Her thesis is focused in exploring the role of bovine adipose tissue in the host immune response to infection. She is part of the immunology of infection (IOI) group of Unit for Multidisciplinary Research in Biomedicine (UMIB) under the guidance of Prof. Luzia Teixeira, a scientist with a solid experience in the field of adipose tissue, infection & immunity.


Barbara Oliveira

Barbara Oliveira, Veterinarian graduated from the Federal University of Bahia (UFBA), Brazil (2014). Master of Science with an emphasis on Biotechnology in Health and Investigative Medicine by the Research Center Gonçalo Moniz (CPqGM), Foundation Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Brazil (2016). Obtained the recognition / equivalence / Master's degree in Veterinary Medicine by the Portuguese Institution, the Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar da Universidade do Porto (ICBAS-UP). Currently, is a PhD student in the Doctoral Program in Veterinary Sciences at the ICBAS | UP, funded by FCT, Portugal. Her thesis is focused in exploring the role of bovine adipose tissue in the host immune response to infection. She is part of the immunology of infection (IOI) group of Unit for Multidisciplinary Research in Biomedicine (UMIB) under the guidance of Prof. Luzia Teixeira, a scientist with a solid experience in the field of adipose tissue, infection & immunity.

Barbara Oliveira, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Portugal: “IL-10 production by bovine adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction cells upon in vitro stimulation with Neospora caninum antigens”
16:20-16:27
Kristina Spariosu

Kristina Spariosu is a PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade. After obtaining her DVM degree, she completed one-year internship at a Small Animal Practice ,,Mondo Animale" and Veterinary Specialist Institute ,,Pančevo", both located in her hometown Pančevo. Since 2017, she works as as researcher at the Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Belgrade. During previous years, she perfected her laboratory experience regarding cell culture techniques, as well as various types of electrophoresis, Western blotting and ELISA tests. Kristina is currently writing her thesis that is focused upon functional activity of white blood cells of dogs that are infected with Babesia canis. In her free time, she enjoys long walks with her dogs Lajra, Feba and Žuća. 


Kristina Spariosu

Kristina Spariosu is a PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade. After obtaining her DVM degree, she completed one-year internship at a Small Animal Practice ,,Mondo Animale" and Veterinary Specialist Institute ,,Pančevo", both located in her hometown Pančevo. Since 2017, she works as as researcher at the Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Belgrade. During previous years, she perfected her laboratory experience regarding cell culture techniques, as well as various types of electrophoresis, Western blotting and ELISA tests. Kristina is currently writing her thesis that is focused upon functional activity of white blood cells of dogs that are infected with Babesia canis. In her free time, she enjoys long walks with her dogs Lajra, Feba and Žuća. 

Kristina Spariosu, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia: “In vitro functional activity of neutrophils and lymphocytes of dogs with acute Babesia canis infection”
16:30-17:00 Coffee break with fortune telling
YOUNG VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Andjelo Beletić & Lindert Benedictus
17:00-17:20
Dirk Werling

Dirk Werling studied Veterinary Medicine at the Veterinary University Hannover. Since 2003, he works at the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, where he is currently Professor of Molecular Immunology and Director of the Centre for Vaccinology and Regenerative Medicine.


Dirk Werling

Dirk Werling studied Veterinary Medicine at the Veterinary University Hannover. Since 2003, he works at the Royal Veterinary College, University of London, where he is currently Professor of Molecular Immunology and Director of the Centre for Vaccinology and Regenerative Medicine.

Dirk Werling, University of London, Royal Veterinary College, United Kingdom: “The roadway to a successful research grant application-the "pocket guide" for a young veterinarian”
17:30-17:45
Elisa Crisci

Dr. Elisa Crisci received her DVM from the University of Bologna (Italy) and MS and PhD in Veterinary Health and Medicine, with focus in immunology and virology, at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and CReSA (animal health research institute, IRTA) in Barcelona, Spain. During her PhD she performed several internships to gain skills in immunology and virology, in particular in Scotland (IMS, Aberdeen), Belgium (Ghent University) and Australia (WEHI, Melbourne). She worked with virus-like particles as vaccine vectors, different porcine viruses and with Biolevel 3 zoonotic pathogens.

She did her post-doctoral training at Linköping University (Sweden) and INRA (French public research institute dedicated to agricultural science) in Jouy-en-Josas (Paris, France). Finally, she moved to USA in 2018 and joined the College of Veterinary Medicine of North Carolina State University as an Assistant Professor.

Elisa define herself as a swine “viro-immunologist” and her current research address the virus-host interactions in porcine diseases with a focus on Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and influenza virus. Her research interests are innate immunity, complement and respiratory viruses and she promote the use of pig as large animal model for human research.

https://cvm.ncsu.edu/directory/ crisci-elisa/


Elisa Crisci

Dr. Elisa Crisci received her DVM from the University of Bologna (Italy) and MS and PhD in Veterinary Health and Medicine, with focus in immunology and virology, at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and CReSA (animal health research institute, IRTA) in Barcelona, Spain. During her PhD she performed several internships to gain skills in immunology and virology, in particular in Scotland (IMS, Aberdeen), Belgium (Ghent University) and Australia (WEHI, Melbourne). She worked with virus-like particles as vaccine vectors, different porcine viruses and with Biolevel 3 zoonotic pathogens.

She did her post-doctoral training at Linköping University (Sweden) and INRA (French public research institute dedicated to agricultural science) in Jouy-en-Josas (Paris, France). Finally, she moved to USA in 2018 and joined the College of Veterinary Medicine of North Carolina State University as an Assistant Professor.

Elisa define herself as a swine “viro-immunologist” and her current research address the virus-host interactions in porcine diseases with a focus on Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and influenza virus. Her research interests are innate immunity, complement and respiratory viruses and she promote the use of pig as large animal model for human research.

https://cvm.ncsu.edu/directory/ crisci-elisa/

Elisa Crisci, Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, NC State University, College of Veterinary Medicine: “Veterinary Immunology Career in Academia ”
17:50-18:05
Miladin Kostović

Dr. Miladin Kostovic is the CEO of Ellie LLC and Biotehnika IVD, companies that produce veterinary diagnostics with a special emphasis on brucellosis. He is a veterinarian with a Master of Veterinary Sciences degree from the University of Belgrade. While there, he worked at the School of Veterinary Medicine as an assistant professor in the Department of Microbiology and ran a brucellosis reference laboratory that aided in the brucellosis eradication program in Serbia. He served as a consultant to the Serbian government regarding its annual disease eradication program protocols and data analysis. He continued his career in the United States working at VMRD Inc. as a marketing manager. He later moved to a position at Prionics A.G. His focus is on the eradication of brucellosis and the development of modern diagnostic tools for use in human and veterinary medicine.

 


Miladin Kostović

Dr. Miladin Kostovic is the CEO of Ellie LLC and Biotehnika IVD, companies that produce veterinary diagnostics with a special emphasis on brucellosis. He is a veterinarian with a Master of Veterinary Sciences degree from the University of Belgrade. While there, he worked at the School of Veterinary Medicine as an assistant professor in the Department of Microbiology and ran a brucellosis reference laboratory that aided in the brucellosis eradication program in Serbia. He served as a consultant to the Serbian government regarding its annual disease eradication program protocols and data analysis. He continued his career in the United States working at VMRD Inc. as a marketing manager. He later moved to a position at Prionics A.G. His focus is on the eradication of brucellosis and the development of modern diagnostic tools for use in human and veterinary medicine.

 

Miladin Kostović, Ellie Laboratories, USA: “Veterinary Immunology Career in Industry ”
18:10-18:18
Emil Lagumdžić

Emil Lagumdzic is currently Immunology Research Scientist and a PhD Candidate working under guidance of Prof. Armin Saalmüller at the Institute of Immunology (University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna). His research focuses on phenotypic and functional differentiation of CD8+ cytolytic T-cells (CTLs). Specifically, he is interested in the differentiation stages from naive CTL to effector and memory CTL.

Before joining Institute of Immunology, he obtained the degree of Doctor in Veterinary Medicine with thesis on "RNA-based, Multiplexed Profiling of Immune Responses in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)" at the Boehringer Ingelheim RCV (Department of Research Oncology: Genomics Research Lab / Biomarker and Translational Research) and the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology (Division of Clinical Pharmacology). During his DVM he performed several research internships to gain skills in immunology, histology and laboratory animal science, in particular at the Institute of Biomedical Research (Medical University of Graz), the Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology and the Institute of Laboratory Animal Science (University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna).

Although his focus has been immunology, he has acquired a diverse bioinformatics experience in the analysis of genomic and imaging data. In addition to performing research, he is committed to teaching and makes active contributions to the development of the relevant Immunology courses at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna.


Emil Lagumdžić

Emil Lagumdzic is currently Immunology Research Scientist and a PhD Candidate working under guidance of Prof. Armin Saalmüller at the Institute of Immunology (University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna). His research focuses on phenotypic and functional differentiation of CD8+ cytolytic T-cells (CTLs). Specifically, he is interested in the differentiation stages from naive CTL to effector and memory CTL.

Before joining Institute of Immunology, he obtained the degree of Doctor in Veterinary Medicine with thesis on "RNA-based, Multiplexed Profiling of Immune Responses in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)" at the Boehringer Ingelheim RCV (Department of Research Oncology: Genomics Research Lab / Biomarker and Translational Research) and the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology (Division of Clinical Pharmacology). During his DVM he performed several research internships to gain skills in immunology, histology and laboratory animal science, in particular at the Institute of Biomedical Research (Medical University of Graz), the Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology and the Institute of Laboratory Animal Science (University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna).

Although his focus has been immunology, he has acquired a diverse bioinformatics experience in the analysis of genomic and imaging data. In addition to performing research, he is committed to teaching and makes active contributions to the development of the relevant Immunology courses at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna.

Emil Lagumdžić, Institute of Immunology, Department of Pathobiology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria: “Bridging Industry and Academia: Transferring industrial experience to academic and vice versa”
18:20-18:28Emilia Radulović Institut of Virology and immunology, Bern Switzerland: “The immunological and hygienic status of pigs define disease severity of African Swine Fever”
Parallel Sessions B
Tuesday, 31 August 2021
PET/HORSE IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Eva Wattrang & Falko Steinbach
15:00-15:25
Brad Rosenberg

Dr. Brad Rosenberg is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Yale University, where his research focused on immune cell chemotaxis. He undertook his graduate training in the Tri-Institutional MD/PhD program jointly administered by Weill-Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Institute. During his PhD work, he developed comparative transcriptomics techniques to study RNA editing. After completing his MD training, he received the NIH Director’s Early Independence Award and established his laboratory as a John C. Whitehead Presidential Fellow at The Rockefeller University. In 2017, Brad joined the faculty of the Department of Microbiology at Mount Sinai. Using an integrative approach that combines experimental immunology and virology, single cell transcriptomics, and computational methodologies, his research group investigates host responses to viral infections in diverse systems and species.


Brad Rosenberg

Dr. Brad Rosenberg is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Yale University, where his research focused on immune cell chemotaxis. He undertook his graduate training in the Tri-Institutional MD/PhD program jointly administered by Weill-Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Institute. During his PhD work, he developed comparative transcriptomics techniques to study RNA editing. After completing his MD training, he received the NIH Director’s Early Independence Award and established his laboratory as a John C. Whitehead Presidential Fellow at The Rockefeller University. In 2017, Brad joined the faculty of the Department of Microbiology at Mount Sinai. Using an integrative approach that combines experimental immunology and virology, single cell transcriptomics, and computational methodologies, his research group investigates host responses to viral infections in diverse systems and species.

Brad Rosenberg, Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA: “High resolution characterization of equine immune cells by single cell RNA-Seq”
15:30-15:39
Diana Dakik

Diana is currently a PhD candidate at the Animal and Plant Health Agency with the University of Surrey. Her rearch focuses on the identification and characterisation of equine dendritic cells and their interactions with viruses. 


Diana Dakik

Diana is currently a PhD candidate at the Animal and Plant Health Agency with the University of Surrey. Her rearch focuses on the identification and characterisation of equine dendritic cells and their interactions with viruses. 

Diana Dakik, University of Surrey/Animal and Plant Health Agency, UK: “Identification of Equine Dendritic Cells”
15:42-15:51Eliane Marti, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Switzerland: “Keratinocytes act as amplifiers of the allergic immune response in equine skin allergy ”
15:54-16:03
Eric Cox

Eric Cox graduated in 1983 as doctor in Veterinary Medicine at Ghent University, where he became appointed as professor Immunology in 1993. 

His main research topic is the intestinal mucosal immune system of animals and how to activate this using innovative vaccination strategies. His research group uses the knowledge on mucosal immunity to study the host-pathogen interaction at the intestinal mucosa of  enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC),  shigatoxin-producing E. coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia species in pigs, sheep and/or calves. This resulted among others in the discovery of the intestinal receptors for F4 and F18 ETEC and 3 patents on innovative strategies to prevent infection. More recently, food allergy in dogs and desensitization strategies are studied. 

He is author or co-author of more than 270 publications in refereed journals and 6 book chapters. He has been promotor of 45 PhD theses and has given more than 140 oral presentations.

 

Eric Cox

Eric Cox graduated in 1983 as doctor in Veterinary Medicine at Ghent University, where he became appointed as professor Immunology in 1993. 

His main research topic is the intestinal mucosal immune system of animals and how to activate this using innovative vaccination strategies. His research group uses the knowledge on mucosal immunity to study the host-pathogen interaction at the intestinal mucosa of  enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC),  shigatoxin-producing E. coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia species in pigs, sheep and/or calves. This resulted among others in the discovery of the intestinal receptors for F4 and F18 ETEC and 3 patents on innovative strategies to prevent infection. More recently, food allergy in dogs and desensitization strategies are studied. 

He is author or co-author of more than 270 publications in refereed journals and 6 book chapters. He has been promotor of 45 PhD theses and has given more than 140 oral presentations.

 
Eric Cox, Laboratory of Immunology, Ghent University, Belgium: “Calcitriol downregulates CXCL8 production in canine primary sublingual epithelial cells”
16:06-16:15Leonie Fingerhut, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Germany: “Is there a detrimental impact of neutrophil extracellular traps on equine recurrent uveitis (ERU)?”
16:18-16:27
Lucia Borlle

Lucia Borlle, MedVet, MS, is a PhD student at Cornell University. She uses single cell genomics to study the causes of a primary immunodeficiency that affects people and horses, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, CVID. After completing her degree in veterinary medicine in Argentina, she practiced in private small animal clinical practices and in a diagnostics laboratory. In the United States, she has worked as a research associate and as a postdoc in the College of Veterinary Medicine of Cornell University before starting her MS/PhD program. Her background also includes veterinary medicine, oncology research, clinical immunology, and genomics.


Lucia Borlle

Lucia Borlle, MedVet, MS, is a PhD student at Cornell University. She uses single cell genomics to study the causes of a primary immunodeficiency that affects people and horses, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, CVID. After completing her degree in veterinary medicine in Argentina, she practiced in private small animal clinical practices and in a diagnostics laboratory. In the United States, she has worked as a research associate and as a postdoc in the College of Veterinary Medicine of Cornell University before starting her MS/PhD program. Her background also includes veterinary medicine, oncology research, clinical immunology, and genomics.

Lucia Borlle, Cornell University, USA: “Are transposable elements at the center of equine Common Variable Immunodeficiency etiology?”
16:30-17:00 Coffee break with fortune telling
TEACHING VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY
Moderators: Armin Saalmüller & Thomas Goebel

Immunology holds a unique role within the veterinary curriculum, since it functions as an integrative subject between basic, infectious and clinical sciences. There are multiple ways to teach veterinary immunology from a very systematic to an integrated approach and likewise the formats of classes are quite diverse. In this workshop we will openly discuss advantages of different veterinary immunology teaching modules. Ideally, everybody should get new ideas by this workshop to improve their immunology classes. We will also talk about platforms to share teaching material.

17:00-17:10
Miroslav Toman

Professor of immunology at the University of Veterinary Sciences, Brno and senior researcher at the Veterinary Research Institute, Brno, the Czech Republic

Education:

1972-1978     Undergraduate studies at the University of Veterinary Sciences, Brno (DVM).

1982-1985     Veterinary Research Institute, Brno - postgraduate scholarship (Ph.D.).

1997             University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno, (Assoc. Prof.).

2004                University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno, Full Professor of Immunology and Microbiology   

Field of scientific interest: clinical imunology of companion animals and immunity against infections of farm animals and possibilities of specific immunoprophylaxis


Miroslav Toman

Professor of immunology at the University of Veterinary Sciences, Brno and senior researcher at the Veterinary Research Institute, Brno, the Czech Republic

Education:

1972-1978     Undergraduate studies at the University of Veterinary Sciences, Brno (DVM).

1982-1985     Veterinary Research Institute, Brno - postgraduate scholarship (Ph.D.).

1997             University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno, (Assoc. Prof.).

2004                University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno, Full Professor of Immunology and Microbiology   

Field of scientific interest: clinical imunology of companion animals and immunity against infections of farm animals and possibilities of specific immunoprophylaxis

Miroslav Toman Veterinary Research Institute: “Teaching Immunology at the Veterinary University in the Czech Republic”
17:15-17:25
Thomas Gobel

Prof. Dr. Thomas Göbel, Dean of Student Affairs, Professor for Veterinary Immunology, Veterinary Faculty, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. Thomas Göbel´s research focuses on comparative analyses of adaptive immune responses employing the molecular and functional characterization of surface receptors on T cells and natural killer cells. His group has provided a detailed model of the chicken T cell receptor and its subunits. Göbel´s current studies center on the genomic diversity and functions of gamma,deltaT cells as well as immunoregulatory families in the chicken with special interest to identify novel ligands of these receptors and to establish novel immune evasion mechanisms.

Thomas Göbel has studied veterinary medicine in Munich. Following his doctoral thesis in Munich he took a postdoc position in Prof. Dr. Coopers lab at the University of Birmingham at Alabama. He then joined the Basel Institute of Immunology as member for four years before he returned to Munich as a professor of veterinary immunology at the veterinary department. Since 2003 he serves as dean of student affairs.


Thomas Gobel

Prof. Dr. Thomas Göbel, Dean of Student Affairs, Professor for Veterinary Immunology, Veterinary Faculty, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. Thomas Göbel´s research focuses on comparative analyses of adaptive immune responses employing the molecular and functional characterization of surface receptors on T cells and natural killer cells. His group has provided a detailed model of the chicken T cell receptor and its subunits. Göbel´s current studies center on the genomic diversity and functions of gamma,deltaT cells as well as immunoregulatory families in the chicken with special interest to identify novel ligands of these receptors and to establish novel immune evasion mechanisms.

Thomas Göbel has studied veterinary medicine in Munich. Following his doctoral thesis in Munich he took a postdoc position in Prof. Dr. Coopers lab at the University of Birmingham at Alabama. He then joined the Basel Institute of Immunology as member for four years before he returned to Munich as a professor of veterinary immunology at the veterinary department. Since 2003 he serves as dean of student affairs.

Thomas Gobel LMU München: “Blended Veterinary Immunology Teaching ”
17:30-17:49Discussion “Overview Veterinary Teaching”
17:50-18:09Discussion “Types of Exams”
18:10-18:30Discussion “Distribution of Material”
Official Closing
Tuesday, 31 August 2021
CLOSING CEREMONY ROOM A
Moderators: Isabelle Schwartz & Gregers Jungersen
18:35-18:42
Isabelle Schwartz

Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil (DVM, PhD), a Chair-elect of EVIG, works at the French National Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) in France. She is the head of the “Vaccine, Viruses and Immunopathology” team in the Molecular Virology and Immunology department at INRA in Jouy-en-Josas, near Paris. Over the last 20 years, she has developed an expertise in the molecular and functional characterization of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in sheep and pigs, at homeostasis and during viral infections and she has worked on vaccine strategies targeting dendritic cells. Currently she is developing immunoregulatory strategies targeting macrophages and dendritic cells to improve lung transplant survival in the pig as a biomedical model.

 


Isabelle Schwartz

Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil (DVM, PhD), a Chair-elect of EVIG, works at the French National Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) in France. She is the head of the “Vaccine, Viruses and Immunopathology” team in the Molecular Virology and Immunology department at INRA in Jouy-en-Josas, near Paris. Over the last 20 years, she has developed an expertise in the molecular and functional characterization of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in sheep and pigs, at homeostasis and during viral infections and she has worked on vaccine strategies targeting dendritic cells. Currently she is developing immunoregulatory strategies targeting macrophages and dendritic cells to improve lung transplant survival in the pig as a biomedical model.

 

Isabelle Schwartz, INRAE: “Closing Session”
18:42-18:49
Isabelle Schwartz

Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil (DVM, PhD), a Chair-elect of EVIG, works at the French National Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) in France. She is the head of the “Vaccine, Viruses and Immunopathology” team in the Molecular Virology and Immunology department at INRA in Jouy-en-Josas, near Paris. Over the last 20 years, she has developed an expertise in the molecular and functional characterization of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in sheep and pigs, at homeostasis and during viral infections and she has worked on vaccine strategies targeting dendritic cells. Currently she is developing immunoregulatory strategies targeting macrophages and dendritic cells to improve lung transplant survival in the pig as a biomedical model.

 


Isabelle Schwartz

Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil (DVM, PhD), a Chair-elect of EVIG, works at the French National Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE) in France. She is the head of the “Vaccine, Viruses and Immunopathology” team in the Molecular Virology and Immunology department at INRA in Jouy-en-Josas, near Paris. Over the last 20 years, she has developed an expertise in the molecular and functional characterization of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in sheep and pigs, at homeostasis and during viral infections and she has worked on vaccine strategies targeting dendritic cells. Currently she is developing immunoregulatory strategies targeting macrophages and dendritic cells to improve lung transplant survival in the pig as a biomedical model.

 

Isabelle Schwartz, INRAE: “Announcement of EVIG Award Winners”
Scientific Committee of the 7th EVIW
Gregers Jungersen, Center for Vaccine Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark
Isabelle Schwartz, French National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and the Environment, France
Milica Kovačević Filipović, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Serbia
Wilhelm Gerner, The Pirbright Institute, United Kingdom
Dirk Werling, University of London, Royal Veterinary College, United Kingdom
Bill Golde, Moredun Research Institute, United Kingdom
Artur Summerfield, University of Bern, Institute of Virology and Immunology, Switzerland
Friederike Ebner, Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Germany
Jayne Hope, The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
William Mwangi, The Pirbright Institute, United Kingdom
Femke Broere, Utrecht University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, The Netherlands
Sabine Hammer, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Department of Pathobiology Institute of Immunology, Austria
Eric Cox, University of Gent, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Belgium
Robin Flynn, University of Liverpool, Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences, United Kingdom
Laia Solano-Gallego, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Spain
Andjelo Beletić, Center for Medical Biochemistry, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
Lindert Benedictus, Utrecht University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, The Netherlands
Uwe Fischer, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Greifswald-Insel Riems, Germany
Dušan Palić, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Germany
Tina Dalgaard, Aarhus University, Department of Animal Science, Tjele, Denmark
Lonneke Vervelde, University of Edinburgh, The Roslin Institute, United Kingdom
Eva Wattrang, National Veterinary Institute, Sweden
Falko Steinbach, University of Surrey, School of Veterinary Medicine, United Kingdom
Thomas Goebel, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Germany
Armin Saalmüller, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Immunology, Austria
Jelena Ajtić, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Serbia
Local Organizing Committee (Veterinary Education Team, Serbia – Veterinarski edukacioni tim, Srbija)
Milica Kovačević Filipović
Andjelo Beletić
Jelena Ajtić